Charlton Heston Forums

The only forum on the internet dedicated to Charlton Heston
It is currently Sat Jun 24, 2017 5:25 am

All times are UTC



Welcome
Welcome to Charlton Heston Forums - The only forum on the internet dedicated to the legendary actor Charlton Heston!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest, which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our free community, you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content, and access many other special features. In addition, registered members also see less advertisements. Registration is fast, simple, and absolutely free, so please, join our community today!


Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 23 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: The Buccaneer
PostPosted: Sun Oct 23, 2011 10:06 pm 
Offline
Michelangelo

Joined: Tue Nov 09, 2010 4:11 pm
Posts: 670
1959 Nominated for Oscar Best Costume Design, Black-and-White or Color (Ralph Jester,Edith Head,John Jensen)

Image
(Original film poster (Spanish version))


Top
 Profile  
 
 
 Post subject: Re: The Buccaneer
PostPosted: Sun Apr 01, 2012 4:51 am 
Offline
Prince Judah
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 09, 2010 1:18 am
Posts: 1360
I finally watched The Buccaneer as it was meant to be watched - on the new, high quality DVD release. I'd seen it many years ago on TV and then obtained a DVD-R, but those were poor representations of the picture, so it was as if I was seeing it for the first time earlier today. Visually, it's DeMille, a direct follow-up to his The TEN COMMANDMENTS (it was even marketed that way, as can be seen on posters earlier in this thread), even if it was directed by Anthony Quinn. Watching some early scenes, like the bazaar scenes, I can picture in my head DeMille ordering as many different bright colors on the clothes and wares as was possible for the scenes :D .

Besides reuniting Heston & Brynner, this also has Woody Strode in a small, mute role (he was the king of Ethiopia in T10C). More than that, though, many of the same technicians and behind-the-scenes artists returned for this one from T10C, as well as DeMille's assistant Henry Wilcoxon to produce it; and the music, by Elmer Bernstein, just screams 10 COMMANDMENTS part deux in some places. So, I'm thinking that first-time director Quinn (then DeMille's son-in-law) got a lot of help from DeMille and friends. And, lest we forget, DeMille himself introduces the film, much like he did T10C.

The film's story is a bit sluggish in places (Quinn's inexperience) and misses some beats. The key plot turn is when the Americans betray LaFitte (Brynner) and all his compatriots; you would think that LaFitte would be enraged for the remainder of the film. Well, he's annoyed for a few minutes and then decides to help Jackson (Heston) and the Americans against the British. This paints LaFitte as a very superficial character indeed. Heston strolls and stomps through the film as one of his living legend giants, now very familiar to us all. He has a key scene near the end when he has to raise his voice in anger & warning, and the entire crowd in this scene seems to wilt and deflate like subdued infants under his awesome stare :lol: .

As far as Heston taking this small role, as someone mentioned earlier in this thread, I just read on the IMDb threads that he was paid $250,000, which was a huge sum back then, especially for such a supporting role (and therefore less work). I dunno for certain if this is accurate, though. And, Heston probably felt he owed DeMille, in any case. In all, this is standard, vintage DeMille entertainment, which is to say it's better than many films of that period, simply for its ambition, stars and scope.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Buccaneer
PostPosted: Tue Apr 03, 2012 2:35 pm 
Offline
Prince Judah
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jul 24, 2011 6:03 am
Posts: 1255
In which film Chuck looks closer in appearance to Andrew Jackson, in your opinion? In this one or in 'THE PRESIDENT's LADY'?

_________________
Image

I know this Man!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Buccaneer
PostPosted: Wed Apr 04, 2012 3:40 am 
Offline
Prince Judah
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 09, 2010 1:18 am
Posts: 1360
itsjudah24 wrote:
In which film Chuck looks closer in appearance to Andrew Jackson, in your opinion? In this one or in 'THE PRESIDENT's LADY'?

Unfortunately, I can't give an opinion on this. THE PRESIDENT'S LADY is one of the last Heston films still not released on an official DVD and I never acquired a DVD-R or a VHS version. I don't remember seeing it; if I did, it was 35 - 40 years ago on TV, when I was a little kid. I know there are photos that I can refer to (I posted some in the famous Great Stills thread), but those aren't really enough to provide me with good judgment on this subject. Maybe someone else here who has seen both films recently can comment on this.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Buccaneer
PostPosted: Thu May 24, 2012 11:42 pm 
Offline
Michelangelo

Joined: Tue Nov 09, 2010 4:11 pm
Posts: 670
The Buccaneer (6/7) Movie CLIP - Proposition (1958) HD



:cheers:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Buccaneer
PostPosted: Fri May 25, 2012 2:44 am 
Offline
Prince Judah
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jul 24, 2011 6:03 am
Posts: 1255
Thank you CHfan! This is the first time I watch any clip of this movie. You always find such rare things, God bless you.

_________________
Image

I know this Man!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Buccaneer
PostPosted: Fri May 25, 2012 2:16 pm 
Offline
El Cid
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2010 6:11 pm
Posts: 1137
Location: Lincoln, England
itsjudah24 wrote:
In which film Chuck looks closer in appearance to Andrew Jackson, in your opinion? In this one or in 'THE PRESIDENT's LADY'?


Judah, as I wrote in an earlier post, Heston looked the image of Jackson in THE BUCCANEER, but unfortunately Heston's make-up was based on Jackson as a much older man. THE PRESIDENT's LADY is a very good movie, it was one of Lydia's favourite movies of her husband, along with THE AGONY AND THE ECSTASY and KHARTOUM.
Coincidentally, Irving Stone wrote "The President's Lady" and the story of Michelangelo painting the Sistine Chapel.

The only thing wrong with THE PRESIDENT's LADY is that they filmed it in black and white. If ever a movie needed to be filmed in colour it was this one ... with all the outdoor scenes and spirit of adventure and native Americana.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Buccaneer
PostPosted: Sun May 27, 2012 3:18 am 
Offline
Prince Judah
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jul 24, 2011 6:03 am
Posts: 1255
Thank you so much for the clarification. I have read somewhere that DeMille presented Chuck a small statue of Andrew Jackson, which he kepts in his study. He was pretty satisfied that the look of the statue seemed so close to his make-up in the movie. I have found a picture of DeMille handing the gift to Chuck, but the image cannot be copied to be pasted here for all to see.

_________________
Image

I know this Man!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Buccaneer
PostPosted: Thu Jan 02, 2014 4:26 am 
Offline
Astronaut

Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2011 9:50 am
Posts: 598
A nice review of 'The Buccaneer'--

Guest Review: The Buccaneer (1958)

A Film Review by Tennessee Jed

How many times have you heard critics use the phrase “for fans only”? The Buccaneer was meant to be Cecil B. DeMilleʼs re-make of his own 1938 film, and seemingly had everything going for it. Starting with the obvious credibility of DeMille himself, it boasts a great cast including Yul Brynner and Charlton Heston at the prime, Inger Stevens, Claire Bloom, Charles Boyer, E. G. Marshall, and Lorne Greene.

A highly romanticized story based on real historical figure Jean Lafitte (Brynner), the film follows events leading up to the Battle of New Orleans at the conclusion of the War of 1812. Although he doesn’t prey on American ships, Lafitte remains an outlaw since he sells merchandise tax free which, combined with his considerable personal charm, makes him popular with the local citizenry. When the British threaten the city, Lafitte must choose between fighting on the probable winning side (where he is not an outlaw) or joining forces with General Andrew Jackson (Heston). His ultimate choice is influenced by a combination of patriotism, a romance with the governor’s daughter Annette Clairborne (Stevens), and probably most importantly, a promise of full pardon for past crimes authorized by Gov. William Clairborne (E.G. Marshall).

Released December 1, 1958 when historical costume productions were much in vogue, this one never quite lived up to expectations. Critics have been mostly lukewarm, and I cannot entirely disagree despite my own lofty expectations for the recent DVD and Blu-Ray release. That expectation was based, at least in part, upon originally viewing it at age ten in one of the old movie palaces in downtown Philadelphia. Should you invest your time and money in The Buccaneer? Perhaps, if you are “a fan.” Let’s explore not only some reasons you might choose to skip this one, but also some reasons you might find it worth re-visiting.

Three Reasons To Skip It

1) It was not actually directed by the great “Cecil B.” after all. By the time filming commenced, DeMille was nearly 80 years old and critically ill. This was his last credited film as he died shortly after it was released. Unable to direct for himself, his son-in-law, Anthony Quinn pinch hit. Trouble was, although Quinn was one of the great actors of his generation, he had no directorial experience of his own, and it shows. Direction is aimless and stilted. This is the only directing ever done by Quinn and we can apparently be thankful for that.

2) The film lacks realism. It looks an awful lot like a musical without music, although that may not entirely be by accident. It turns out DeMille intended his “re-make” to be a musical. He most likely wanted to cash in on Brynner's success from The King and I. For some reason, Yul balked at the idea of another musical, and there was no question DeMille needed Brynner for the lead, so that concept was scrapped. Still, too many group scenes include people dutifully standing stock still while the leads recite speeches in lieu of singing songs. This is particularly true for Brynner who constantly delivers his lines while standing with feet spread apart, hands on hips, and wearing his ballet tights, calf high boots, open puff sleeved shirt, and leather vest. Of course just seeing him with hair can unsettle the unsuspecting viewer.

3) The story line develops too slowly. The way the film was marketed, one expects a big pirate action adventure with a major historical battle as the climax. Realistically, the film is more dialogue driven with a strong romantic interest. It takes far too long to lay out all the conflicts Lafitte must resolve in order to make the decision that essentially forms the heart of the movie. Apparently, the real Lafitte actually had an affair with the governor’s wife rather than his daughter as portrayed on film. I suspect that had more to do with appealing to both men and women, as well as keeping with the social mores of the time.

. . . And Three Reasons For Fans to Watch It Anyway

1) Heston, Brynner, and Stevens light up the screen. Charlton Heston and Yul Brynner reprise their co-star duties from The Ten Commandments. Now this film should never, ever, be mistaken for that masterpiece, but these two guys were film giants in an era known for its movie stars. Interestingly, although it’s a supporting role, I actually liked the performance of Heston as Jackson better than Brynner’s Lafitte. He’s in the very first scene and creates such a commanding presence that he dominates every scene he’s in, including those with Brynner. It may come down to something as simple as Heston being born to play historical figures. It’s all about the “gravitas”. This is not to say Yul was deficient. He’s an incredibly commanding figure to be sure, yet for me, Heston loomed larger.

Inger Stevens is an actress who died too young and never received much credit for her craftsmanship. I found her to be both beautiful and compelling in this film as the governor’s daughter and Lafitte’s love interest. There is just enough of a clash between lovers from two different cultures to create plausible romantic tension.

2) Hey, come on . . . we ARE talking “The Battle of New Orleans” here, aren’t we?! The costumes alone are magnificent considering when it was made. In fact, the only academy award nomination for The Buccaneer was for costume design. What ultimately won me over, though, is the advance through the fog by British Troops under artillery bombardment while the Black Watch dutifully plays an attack march on their bagpipes. This particular custom was designed to strike fear into the hearts of the enemy, and there can be no doubt it usually had a chilling effect. In fact, I’d love to see a really good depiction of the Battle of Long Island during the American Revolution, when the British got in back of Washington’s militia. His soldiers had no idea what was coming until they heard the skirl of the pipes -- behind them! This battle scene has a definite “in the studio” feel and has neither the realism nor scope of more modern depictions of war. Still, it’s not bad for the 1950ʼs, and represents the main reason I “just had” to see it again.

3) The Buccaneer looks great in 1080p. True, it was not given the high-end restoration techniques bestowed on Ten Commandments or Ben-Hur. In fact, since I have not seen it in DVD format, it is quite possible this particular restoration would work nearly as well in 480i if a good scaler is handy. Either way, it is amazing how good they can make 50 year old productions look anymore. And at two hours, it doesn’t require that extra long time commitment so often associated with costume period pieces.

So, the bottom line is you can enjoy this one as an interesting study of film techniques in the 50ʼs, as a chance to see some great actors of that era play off each other, or just a chance to see an interesting period in American history portrayed. But if you do happen to pass on it, rest assured you should not lose any sleep over your decision. What other periods or topics in American history do you feel need to be visited again in film?

_________________
Image

My Lord, I too am bewitched!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Buccaneer
PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2014 11:51 pm 
Offline
Call Me Harry
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2010 12:36 am
Posts: 274
Ya know, this still doesn't seem to be on Netflix... I find that very frustrating.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 23 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron

suspicion-preferred