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 Post subject: Re: The Big Country
PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2012 3:57 pm 
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Astronaut

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Here is a link, can anybody tell me what this blogger means to say about the 'fusion' in 'The Big Country'? There is a clip to show the high point of fusion, but I don't know what is so unusual about that part of the movie.

http://microbrewreviews.blogspot.in/201 ... major.html

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 Post subject: Re: The Big Country
PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2012 6:50 pm 
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Prince Judah
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The scene in question is at the point that Heston's Leech character joins the Major (Charles Bickford) and they ride their horses side-by-side towards the eventual confrontation/resolution. I think the blogger is just using fancy terms of his own invention {"fusion"} to mean a "great" scene or even an electrifying scene in cinema. For me, it's a combination of visuals and themes combining for a great, memorable moment in cinema. In this case, Heston's Leech had to make a momentous decision: does he stick with his father figure or do the more rational thing? When characters in film make important decisions like this, determining the direction of the story for the remainder of the film, it's usually a great moment. That, combined with the visual of Leech and the Major riding side-by-side like that, with the music, makes it a truly great moment (I actually liked the moment of all the other cowboys riding to catch up to them even more).

What does all this have to do with fusion? I admit, I find the blogger's use of the term a bit of a stretch; he is comparing such moments in cinema to a nuclear explosion, basically. But, fusion also means a combining of elements like I described: story/themes, visuals/photography, mood/music all combining for a great moment or moments in cinema.


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 Post subject: Re: The Big Country
PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2012 10:53 am 
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That is a great scene, one of my favorites in the movie.

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 Post subject: Re: The Big Country
PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2012 3:29 pm 
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Prince Judah
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Yeah, that scene leads to the revelation of the true Steeve Leech. The hidden humanity of this trough henchman comes out in that scene, but is becomes even more evident after the 'tragedy' is complete. Just think of how Mckay and Leech look at each other, and their respective attitude to what has happened. Mckay, the refined man , the civil gentleman seems out of place to respond to this frontier-tragedy-- he has sensibility, he can fall in love, he can even fight for honour, but he doesnot know how to express to emotive response to the lying deadbodies in front of him. Leech, as a contrast, is about to break his heart upon the dire holocaust. A man like him cannot weep but he would be relieved if he could. The feeling of loss and pain and waste is clearly visible from his humane expression, whereas Mckay looks on with a tightened jaw, and a mechanical appearance.

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 Post subject: Re: The Big Country
PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2012 10:25 pm 
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Michelangelo

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Fort Lauderdale International Film Festival to honor Oscar-nominated "Baby Doll" star Carroll Baker


http://weblogs.sun-sentinel.com/enterta ... nal_1.html

Fort Lauderdale International Film Festival to honor Oscar-nominated "Baby Doll" star Carroll Baker
By Ben Crandell September 24, 2012 05:00 AM
Quote:
The Lifetime Achievement Award at the 2012 Fort Lauderdale International Film Festival will go to one of the silver screen's under-appreciated *** symbols, Carroll Baker. The actress, 81, will take part in a Q&A on Nov. 4 after a 6:45 p.m. Cinema Paradiso screening of “But Not for Me,” a screwball comedy that paired Baker with Clark Gable.
.....
Some of her other films include “The Big Country,” directed by William Wyler and co-starring Gregory Peck and Charlton Heston; “The Carpetbaggers” with Alan Ladd, which was the highest grossing film of 1964; John Ford's “Cheyenne Autumn,” with Richard Widmark and James Stewart; “Harlow,” in which she portrayed film legend Jean Harlow; and the epic western “How the West Was Won.”
.....



:cheers:


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 Post subject: Re: The Big Country
PostPosted: Fri Mar 01, 2013 6:00 pm 
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Prince Judah
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I watched The Big Country again the other day and suddenly began to think about the course that the lives of the main characters would take after the presented conclusion. McKay (Peck) and Julie (Jean Simmons) would probably marry and live on a ranch, but what about Leech (Heston)? Would guilt and a sense of personal failure about the Major's death force him to move on or away? Or would he stay on at the Terrill ranch in some capacity? What really struck me on this latest viewing is how the character of Pat (Carroll Baker) ended up: she has lost her father, to whom she was deeply devoted, and also her potential husband, McKay; she's left with almost nothing - a literary comeuppance for her spoiled nature, I suppose. Or, does she end up with Leech - who may or may not leave? If he does leave, she even loses him, is one way of looking at it.


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 Post subject: Re: The Big Country
PostPosted: Fri Mar 01, 2013 9:08 pm 
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I reckon Leech ends up with Pat, they seem like a good fit after all. Since her father passes away, everything is left to her and by marrying Leech she would make sure the ranch is in good hands for yet another generation.

McKay and Julie would live happily ever after at his new ranch.

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 Post subject: Re: The Big Country
PostPosted: Sat Mar 02, 2013 1:09 am 
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Prince Judah
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Detective Thorn wrote:
I reckon Leech ends up with Pat, they seem like a good fit after all. Since her father passes away, everything is left to her and by marrying Leech she would make sure the ranch is in good hands for yet another generation.
Well, member EL-CID might disagree with that :) - he was of the strong opinion that Leech and Pat were ill-suited to each other. If I were to visualize an extra 10 minutes at the end of the film, a new epilogue, then I can picture Leech being despondent after the Major's death and also fed up with Pat and her ways. I can see him departing in anger - if, for example, Pat blames him for her father's death (or not doing enough to prevent his death). This would also be an incredible triple impact against Pat - her father, McKay and now also Leech gone. It wouldn't be a happy ending but not all good endings have to be happy ones.


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 Post subject: Re: The Big Country
PostPosted: Sat Mar 02, 2013 5:38 am 
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I agree. I also feel that Leech and Pat are not to be matched. Leech, though a henchman and rough, has some basic qualities of goodness and feeling. And I think he has already been fed up with Pat and her ways-- we don't need another 10 minutes to realise that.

But another question for Leech: what will become of him after 20 years, if he does not get another girl to marry? Will end up as a Will penny figure?

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 Post subject: Re: The Big Country
PostPosted: Sat Apr 13, 2013 2:20 am 
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Call Me Harry
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tizzyd wrote:
I agree. I also feel that Leech and Pat are not to be matched. Leech, though a henchman and rough, has some basic qualities of goodness and feeling. And I think he has already been fed up with Pat and her ways-- we don't need another 10 minutes to realise that.

Yeah, I don't see how Leech and Pat would ever work out. Leech may have been a roughneck but deep down he did have a heart and some semblance of principle. Pat not so much. It goes back to that story thread we were talking about before, about Leech wanting to belong. He liked the Terrill's ranch, he'd worked there for years, it was basically his home, he probably fixated on settling down with Pat as part of a desire to cement that belonging.

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But another question for Leech: what will become of him after 20 years, if he does not get another girl to marry? Will end up as a Will penny figure?

Interesting question. I like to think that if Leech could just put some distance between himself and the Terrill tragedy he could find a nicer, more down to Earth lady to hook up with.


I recently started reading a biography on Gregory Peck; only 9 chapters in, I did skip ahead a few chapters and skimmed the Big Country. It touched on how Greg's friendship with director William Wyler became strained during the very tough filming, which Chuck touched on in his autobiography and has been documented elsewhere, but the chapter didn't say anything about Greg's thoughts and feelings towards Heston. IMDB had some stray quote from Greg where he described their relationship as being associates who are "polite and courteous each other" when they meet but added that Greg "strongly disagreed" with Chuck on the whole gun control issue. Chuck seemed to only have good things to say/write about old Greg. Perhaps Greg's thoughts will come up more in later chapters, that has yet to be seen.


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