Charlton Heston Forums

The only forum on the internet dedicated to Charlton Heston
It is currently Sun Jun 25, 2017 3:41 pm

All times are UTC



Welcome
Welcome to Charlton Heston Forums - The only forum on the internet dedicated to the legendary actor Charlton Heston!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest, which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our free community, you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content, and access many other special features. In addition, registered members also see less advertisements. Registration is fast, simple, and absolutely free, so please, join our community today!


Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 838 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81 ... 84  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Secret of the Incas
PostPosted: Fri Jul 01, 2016 3:06 pm 
Offline
El Cid
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2010 6:11 pm
Posts: 1138
Location: Lincoln, England
James Byrne wrote:
Here's some good news after all my setbacks and bad luck; our administrator, Detective Thorn has just sent out the CHARLTON HESTON FORUM BIMONTHLY NEWSLETTER #3 and this item was at the end of it-

ANNOUNCEMENTS
*James Byrne’s terrific fansite dedicated to Secret of the Incas is closing down. On May 19th, it expires and will no longer be available to view. Fortunately, with his permission, I’ve print screened the whole websitefrom top to bottom and have saved each and every picture that was uploadedto the fansite. In the near future, all content will be uploaded on the forum so that James’ site lives on in some form. You can still view the fansite for a few more days over at: http://www.secretoftheincas.co.uk


Thorn, my website is no more ... have you still got my site on your computer?


Last edited by James Byrne on Mon Jul 04, 2016 1:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 
 Post subject: Re: Secret of the Incas
PostPosted: Sat Jul 02, 2016 11:15 am 
Offline
El Cid
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2010 6:11 pm
Posts: 1138
Location: Lincoln, England
Canadian journalist Stephen Franklin interview with Charlton Heston in 1960 in which he incorrectly labels SECRET OF THE INCAS a 'B-movie.'

https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid= ... 5927&hl=en

Ottawa Citizen, 20 August 1960
CHARLTON HESTON IS HOLLYWOOD'S NICE GUY
Stephen Franklin, Weekend Staff writer.

Coldwater Canyon winds upward through the Beverly Hills from Sunset Boulevard, twists, and dips and climbs again until the road breasts the top of the dark green hills and then slants down into the populous acres of the San Fernando Valley. In the rush hour cars snake up and down it in a single sinuous line, but in the middle of the morning it isn't busy. You can drive slowly, watching out for the house numbers, admiring the lush California gardens and at the same time thinking about the man you are going to interview. I was on my way to meet Charlton Heston, star of the two most costly and ambitious motion pictures ever produced. By the time THE TEN COMMANDMENTS and BEN-HUR have run their course, it is estmated, Heston will have been seen by more moviegoers than any other actor. A few weeks before my visit he had won an Academy Award in the arduous title "role of BEN-HUR. Yet despite all this I realized that I knew surprisingly little about Charlton Heston.
There was a memorable performance by Heston in an earlier De Mille epic, THE GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH, as the circus manager pinned down at the mercy of stampeding elephants and the big cats in the train-wreck scene. There was a good role in THE BIG COUNTRY, playing second string to Gregory Peck. And there were vague recollections of a succession of grade-B adventure movies like SECRET OF THE INCAS and PONY EXPRESS, in which it was hard not to just write Heston off as a muscular ham with an impressive talent for striking dramatic poses.
I knew that his friends called him Chuck and that a columnist had recently called him a "square" because he had been married to the same woman for 16 years, had never bopped a fellow diner at Chasens or LaRue's, never thrown a monumental tantrum on the set and not wooed a single international beauty across even one continent. In short, he was poor grist for the gossip mill and a nice guy.
High above the cluster of houses known as Hidden Valley, almost at the crest of Coldwater Canyon, I found the driveway and skirted gingerly round a precipice out to the end of a narrow ridge. The house in front of me was new and jutting and angular in the manner of of modern hilltop homes, but in front of it was a cobbled courtyard which, even without the fountains playing, smacked somewhat of ancient . There was an enormous front door with ham-fisted door handles. Through the glass wall in a curving hallway hung the largest lampshade I had ever seen, a great open-work brass urn dangling down from the ceiling.
Heston answered the door himself. He wore a magenta fishnet shirt, faded blue denims and sandals and it was obvious he was in the middle of listening to something on the stereo hi-fi in his living room. The voice rolling majestically out from the panelled wall was his own. It was his readings from the Books of Moses, the first five books of the Old Testament: ... whosoever is of willing heart, let him bring it, the Lord's offering: gold, and silver and brass; and blue and purple and scarlet and fine linen and goat's hair and ram's skin dyed red and sealskins and acacia wood; and oil for the light and spices for the anointing wool ... " The voice was impressive and resonant.
Looking past the peacock-hued armchairs and the great stone fireplace far down to the dark foliage of the wild walnut trees and the stunted oaks and a distant small green lake, it seemed as if this were really Mt. Sinai and not Beverly Hills and the voice that of Moses and not a 36-year old actor from Evanston, Ill. named Chuck Heston. The rich voice, more mundanely, is an excellent testimonial to Northwestern University's School of Speech in Chicago. There Chuck arrived in 1941 as a tall, shy, rather shabby but intensely eager scholarship student. He spent the next three years learning how to act, majoring in speech and trying to talk a classmate named Lydia Clarke into marrying him.
He was persistent and persuasive enough to convince Lydia then. He is still a good conversationalist with strongly-held and well-considered opinions on subjects he thinks worth discussing. His conversation is somewhat stylized at times and far from monosyllabic.
"I did these for Vanguard after I read some passages from the Books of Moses on the Ed Sullivan Show," explained Heston when the record ended. "I think it has given me as much satisfaction as anything I have ever done. It is such magnificent language. I am doing the readings again on television before I go off to Australia and England; and that is why I was playing them over."
A slight boy of five wearing an outsize black cowboy hat, who had been quiet while the Old Testament passages filled the big living room, came forward. Heston introduced him. "This is Fraser," he said. ""And who am I?" "You're my friendly neighborhood daddy and a big ham," said Fraser and they went into a well-rehearsed movie fight sequence, Fraser aiming a right cross which missed Heston's jaw and ended in a sharp, hidden hand slap. Heston K.O.'d, fell to the floor.
Fray is the Heston's only child, born after 10 years of marriage and as much a focal point of their lives as Chuck's now uncommonly successful career. He is still young enough to travel with them wherever they go - on location or on a personal appearance tour to open BEN-HUR in Australia. Father and son spend a lot of time together. "I am going to start teaching him how to play tennis this afternoon," said Chuck. "Come on and I'll show you around. This is the first house we have ever really lived in. We have 1,400 acres of timberland now up in Michigan and there's a house on that we stay in, but here and in New York we've always lived in apartments until this year. But Fraser needs to be outdoors more now, and so we built this house."
We walked out past the windswept swimming pool to the patio wall and the almost sheer drop below. "The first time a friend of mine who is a psychology professor saw this place he said: "Well, Chuck, I suppose you're all ready to pour boiling oil down on them?" And he is quite right. You soon discover that this castle complex is a very real and atavistic thing - even when the house isn't paid for. You find yourself standing here looking down and muttering to yourself: "They can't get at me!" But seriously, we like it here. I read Ernest Seton Thompson's nature books when I was seven and I thought they were wonderful and acted out all the animals. Now here we are only six minutes from the Beverly Hills Hotel and yet there are coyotes and owls and other small wild animals all around us."
We swung round the cliff to the side of the new house where Heston has an excercise area with iron bars set high on the wall to work out his six foot two, 195-pound frame. Beyond it off the master bedroom is a tiled Swedish steam room where he sweats off any left-over weight. The steam bath ("it caught fire the day we moved in") and the adjacent small glass study which juts out into space like one point of a star, point up two aspects of Chuck Heston the man. No narcissistic muscle-flexer, he nevertheless believes that any conscientious actor who is going to appear stripped to the waist at an oar of a Roman galley must keep in top physical shape. And on the other hand, he is an inveterate letter-writer who pounds out several hundred pages a year on the portable typewriter in his study.
Heston is also an extraordinarily good artist - not a Sunday painter who dabbles in oils, but a pen-and-ink artist who keeps a pad at hand and sketches bystanders, using brown ink. "I seem to give them all away," Heston said, rummaging among the strewn papers the wind from the open window had scattered on his desk. He found some, and they were very good. His wife called us to lunch. Lydia Clarke Heston is a soft-spoken, attractive woman with a soothing quality of composure. "The best wife a man can have," Chuck said at the table, with a bow to Lydia, "is a non-dedicated actress." Lydia Clarke, I discovered, had in fact achieved success on the stage before Heston did. But whether it was a pleasure or a real sacrifice for her to become a "non-dedicated actress" it was impossible to tell on short acquaintance. They were married in Greensboro, N.C., on March 17, 1944.. ("So that I could never forget our anniversary," says Chuck.) He was en route to the U.S. Army Air Force and a subsequent "very bleak two years" as a radio operator in B-29 squadron of the 11th Air Force based at various foul-weather airfields in the Aleutians. When he got out they went to New York and rented a two-room cold-water flat at 433 West 45th street for an excessive $30 dollars a month. Chuck joined the hundreds of oher young actors with high hopes and low - or no - incomes. Lydia brought home the spaghetti and beans by modelling in the garment district.
"We lived for a long time on a total scraped-up income of $3,000 a year," Lydia recalls. "I learned how to haggle in the Ninth avenue markets and managed somehow to feed us on $6 a week." When the stifling heat began to penetrate their flat, the Heston's thankfully joined the migration to summer stock. They returned to North Carolina as co-stars and co-directors of Ashville's Thomas Wolfe Memorial Theatre. Lydia went back to Broadway and the lead opposite Ralph Bellamy in DETECTIVE STORY.
(Chuck himself tried out for the Bellamy role and had a significant encounter with movie director William Wyler. "I turned him down," Wyler recalls. "I told him: I'm sorry, but you just aren't ready for it. One day I think you will be. Because unless I'm mistaken you are one of those actors who matures slowly toward greatness. Then I'll want you!" A decade later Wyler gave him the second lead in THE BIG COUNTRY and, not long after, the much-sought-after title role in M-G-M's $15-million remake of BEN-HUR.

Heston took a swig from a tankard of beer and helped himelf to more slices of cold roast beef. "When he came home from trying out for BEN-HUR," said Lydia, "I looked at his face and said: 'Oh, Chuck, you didn't get it!' He just stood there straight-faced and then stated intoning 'O, ye of little faith .. ' and I started to laugh: 'Why, you're playing Ben-Hur already. You did get it!'"

"BEN-HUR was unquestionably the toughest thing I've ever done," said Heston. "It was the most challenging, the most frusrating and the most back-breaking. There was a total of 189 shooting days outside Rome and I was called every day. So every time somebody says: 'It must have been wonderful to spend almost a year in Rome!' I reply: 'But I only spent 45 Sundays there.'
"A picture with the form and theme of BEN-HUR is the hardest kind of picture to get any recognition out of. And that added to the tremendous thrill of winning that Oscar. That was the first time I'd stayed up until dawn since my first Broadway opening in a small part with Katherine Cornell in ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA.
"People who believe in extra-sensory perception may be interested to know that right up to the last minute at the Academy Awards I had no idea which one of us might win, but I doubted it would be me. Just before Susan Hayward opened the envelope I glanced away to the left; something popped inside my head and suddenly I knew that I was going to get it."
It was characteristic of Charlton Heston that in his brief acceptance speech he should make one pointedly provacative remark, missed by the television audience but duly noted by the industry. He expressed his gratitude to, among others, British playwright Christopher Fry, who had worked on the screen play during the long months of location in Rome. The Writers Guild of America, which had given solo credit for BEN-HUR's screen play to Karl Tunberg, took immediate exception, accused Heston of deliberately questioning their decision, and asked for an apology or a retraction. Heston stuck to his guns, wrote a recalcitrant reply to the Writers Guild in which he told it in essence it was none of its business what he said about non-member Fry and sarcastically asked: "Is it your intention to expunge Mr. Fry's name from the lips of men?"

Although in his 10-year rise to the top in Hollywood Heston has cheerfully appeared in many different movies, he has retained a strong independence of mind and an outspoken voice on professional matters. "We are becoming too much a nation of the majority, " Chuck thinks. "Everybody has to to like the same things. And anything that everybody doesn't like goes out. That's why as an actor I look forward to pay-TV, which you are now trying out in Canada. It's not because I think we'll get rich from it but because I think it will free us actors to do things we can't do for commercial TV or motion pictures."
Over his second helping of black raspberry mousse he went on to explain how with pay-TV it should be possible to do worth-while plays for a minority audience of 100,000 people and to do them profitably.
"The one thing wrong with this business generally," Chuck went on, "is that you can get rich in it. I didn't come into this profession to get rich. I was an actor before I was a star and I'm an actor still. It has been suggested that I may become a director and independant producer, as many other actors have done recently. If I do, it will only be reluctantly and as a solution to the tax problems. The extra pleasure and satisfaction of being your own producer or director are far outweighed I think by the headaches and problems. I just like to act."

Heston's stated aim during his first years in Hollywood was "to become as good an actor by the time I'm 35 as Laurence Olivier." He hasn't made it. On the other hand, he hasn't let success obscure his aim. He took three weeks off last year from shooting THE WRECK OF THE MARY DEARE, a sea saga with Gary Cooper, to play MacBETH at the University of Michigan's drama festival in Ann Arbor and also did a stand with Lydia playing STATE OF THE UNION at the Santa Barbara Summer Theatre.
"A couple of years back I was invited up to your Stratford Festival in Canada," he said, "and I wanted to go, but they asked me to do HENRY V. I told them that I had seen Olivier's HENRY V 16 times and I was convinced his was the definitive characterization and the finest Shakespeare film ever made, so I woud not attempt it."

Throughout his motion picture career Heston has been careful to see that he had time for other media. Although he has never achieved real success on Broadway (he did play the lead opposite Martha Scott in a short-lived play, DESIGN FOR A STAINED-GLASS WINDOW, years ago) he did appear in early days of television on Studio One and other "prestige" drama series in such vehicles as THE TAMING OF THE SHREW, OF HUMAN BONDAGE and JANE EYRE.
It was at this time, in 1950, that Hollywood began thinking in terms of attracting the young TV actor. Hal Wallis, who has built a reputation as one of the shrewdest post-war talent-hunters and star-makers, went after him. Warner Brothers offered him a stock contract. The usual screen test was even waived. Heston nevertheless took his time and signed with Hal Wallis only after a 47-page contract had been drawn up. The contract took a month to write and gave Charlton Heston the right to do stage plays, TV dramas and outside pictures. Warner Brothers were so angry they accused his agents of bad faith and barred them from the lot, thereby starting a short, sharp interecine war.
With predictable banality Hollywood swiftly transformed Heston from Charlotte Bronte's sombre hero into a tough guy behind a snub-nosed revolver for DARK CITY, his first Hollywood film. For his second Paramount starred him as a Sioux Indian. He went on to a succession of roles in which he was often unshaven and invariably armed with a Bowie knife, Colt or Winchester. Despite his increasing success, Chuck and Lydia kept commuting to New York for TV roles, now at $2,000 a time. They also characteristically kept their $30-a-month cold-water flat and by the time they gave it up in 1953 were paying more to garage their cream-colored Packard convertible than their Hell's Kitchen apartment.
Despite the luxury of their costly new home in Coldwater Canyon, bought with some of the $250,000 Chuck earned for BEN-HUR, the Heston's are still not fancy-livers. They rarely go to a night club and do not belong to the Hollywood smart set. Many of their friends are outside the entertainment world - university professors, doctors and other professional men.
It is as a conscientious and responsible member of his own profession who hasn't forgotten his lean years as an actor that Chuck joined the council of the Screen Actors Guild and served on the negotiating committee during the strike. "As an actor I don't think the Guild has helped me personally," he says. "but I feel it does help the majority of the members, who even today only earn between $3,000 and $5,000 a year, and I owe it to them to do whatever I can. As for the strike, I don't think it has altered the industry in any significant way. If we had refused to compromise and the strike had continued then it might have done. As it is, the contract we signed as eminently equitable to both sides."
Heston's plans for the future are as simple as the complexities and pressures of a star's life can be: to go on acting and to continue to enjoy life in his own way. The wise money in Hollywood is that he will well be able to do so; that the end of youth, far from seeing Heston fade, is likely to bring him even more stature on the screen. "Who knows," says Heston with a cheerful shrug. "All I know is right now I've got to go and play tennis."


Last edited by James Byrne on Tue Jul 05, 2016 10:10 am, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Secret of the Incas
PostPosted: Mon Jul 04, 2016 8:24 pm 
Offline
Damned Dirty Admin
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 01, 2010 7:18 pm
Posts: 2636
Location: Sweden
James Byrne wrote:
James Byrne wrote:
Here's some good news after all my setbacks and bad luck; our administrator, Detective Thorn has just sent out the CHARLTON HESTON FORUM BIMONTHLY NEWSLETTER #3 and this item was at the end of it-

ANNOUNCEMENTS
*James Byrne’s terrific fansite dedicated to Secret of the Incas is closing down. On May 19th, it expires and will no longer be available to view. Fortunately, with his permission, I’ve print screened the whole websitefrom top to bottom and have saved each and every picture that was uploadedto the fansite. In the near future, all content will be uploaded on the forum so that James’ site lives on in some form. You can still view the fansite for a few more days over at: http://www.secretoftheincas.co.uk


Thorn, my website is no more ... have you still got my site on your computer?

What?! Has it been two years already? That was for how long the site had been renewed by mistake, wasn't it?

_________________
Image
You know, McKay, you're a bigger fool than I thought you were. And to tell you the truth, that just didn't seem possible.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Secret of the Incas
PostPosted: Tue Jul 05, 2016 10:30 am 
Offline
El Cid
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2010 6:11 pm
Posts: 1138
Location: Lincoln, England
Yes Thorn. My website on SECRET OF THE INCAS, http://www.secretoftheincas.co.uk, was deleted on 25 May 2016 while I was on holiday in London. As you know, the webmaster and I had a serious disagreement a couple of years ago which was never fully resolved. I came back from London and telephoned him about paying the annual fee, but he was extremely busy preparing for his daughter's wedding and then the site was wiped.

I know that you have recently moved house and have a young son, so probably won't have the time to put my site on this forum (assuming that you still have it, that is), so don't worry if you can't. It was just a suggestion, Thorn.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Secret of the Incas
PostPosted: Tue Jul 12, 2016 8:28 am 
Offline
El Cid
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2010 6:11 pm
Posts: 1138
Location: Lincoln, England
On 12 July 2010 I received an email from a Peruvian gentleman, Alejandro Neyra, who told me that he had really enjoyed looking at my website having just viewed SECRET OF THE INCAS. Alejandro also informed me that he was a journalist who usually tried to find "Peruvian themes" to write about, and that he was thinking of doing an article on the Heston film. I answered him immediately, politely urging him to write the piece, and that, if he did so, could he please send me a copy of the magazine.

Fast forward four months, and to my joy Alejandro sent me the September 2010 edition of the magazine, DEDO MEDIO, which is a very popular Peruvian publication, and it had four pages of text and colour photos of the film. It was in Spanish, of course, and Alejandro included an English translation as well, but warned me that there were plenty of "Peruvian slang" words in the text, which didn't translate into any kind of English.

I had no idea who Alejandro Leyra was, and was honoured to discover that not only is he a celebrated journalist in Lima, but also an award-winning novelist, not to mention being the current Cultural Attache of the Peruvian Embassy in Chile. http://www.alejandroneyra.com/biografia.html I was very pleased that he acknowledged my website in the article, saying how "enlightning and fun" it was, and how it helped him while he was writing the article. Here is the text, translated into English.

THE SECRET OF THE INCAS
If you were one of those who left outraged by the thousand and one mistakes of Indiana Jones when he allegedly visited Peru in the last movie in the series, you'll feel better knowing that the real Indiana, strong - tougher and more macho - yes was actually in Peru, and nothing less than Cusco and Machu Picchu. Moreover, he drank pisco, was a gigolo, charged in soles and had a much more manly name: Harry Steele. And he was nothing more and nothing less than Charlton Heston. One of the best kept secrets of the film is that it was filmed in our country.

HARRY STEELE
The fedora, the leather jacket look and holster were not invented by Spielberg or Harrison Ford, sorry Bosé. The true adventurer in search of treasures of the past was Charlton Heston, who came to Peru in 1954 - before BEN-HUR - along with the only Peruvian who has a star on the Walk of Fame Hollywood: Yma Sumac. They and a group of actors directed by Jerry Hopper, director ended in TV directing episodes of "Gilligan's Island", came to Cusco for nearly sixty years ago to shoot in real locations in "THE SECRET OF THE INCAS.

Needless to say that Peru has always had success in Europe and America for its exotic image. Back in the fifties, when there was no Internet, when just a few gringos came to Cusco, a Peruvian Chola conquered Broadway. Her real name was Zoila Augusta Emperatriz Chavarri del Castillo. Beyond her remarkable vocal skills, her husband and manager Moises Vivanco travelled to the United States for the purpose of presenting music of the distant, mythical land of the Incas. And made it beautiful. Someone then came up with the idea that it wouldn't hurt to go to Peru to make a film that could show off Yma Sumac singing and also show some scenes from the famous citadel "discovered" by Hiram Bingham. The success of Cusco was assured and realized, better yet, they invented an adventure story in this magical corner of the world.

Harry Steele may well have been surnamed Pendavis. Has more than any Peruvian corner, probably won in the courts of Asia in WWII, where he gained the pilot's jacket and imposing hat, which shouldn't be frowned upon for shading his tan from the mountain dust and the sun. His day job is a tour guide who grab the gringos who come to Cusco. Charging 100 soles to take them on a tour of Cusco and earn some extra flirting with some aunts who want to see more than Machu Picchu, in fact the first that pays for these additional services is nothing less than a shy girl, Marion Ross ( Richie Cunningham's mom). Harry Steele (call me Harry) says a championship phrase when he sees the silver wondering: "Taking money of women is always the best: it's the hardest to get but it always smells so good" (Applause and a hundred suns.)

Beyond lay the foundation for gaining riches, Harry actually knows a secret. He knows where the golden sunburst with countless diamonds and precious stones that weigh more than five kilos. But he also knows that the Indians of Peru are also eager to find the sunburst, but not for the same reasons. LEGEND OF THE INCA - created by the screenwriter Sidney Boehm, assisted by Albert Giesecke (diplomat, adventurer and rector of the University of Cusco, a character himself) and César Miró (another Peruvian in Hollywood) - the descendants of the Incas expect to find the gold disc representing the sun to restore the greatness lost through conquest. The coveted trophy is hidden, of course, in Machu Picchu.

Harry needs a plane to get to the citadel and then be able to easily escape without being detected. Instead of opting for the simplest solution (to simply get someone to stop appliance and praiseworthy overestimate the National Police of Peru) opts for the most complicated and strange, that is stealing the Romanian consuls plane who comes to Cusco looking for a pretty girl who managed to flee the communist regime and became a dancer in La Paz (the story itself is more amazing that all four Indiana put together.) The fact is that in the end Harry and the beautiful Elena Antonescu - who amazingly comes to Cusco when in fact she wants to go to the United States - get to Machu Picchu where an archaeologist who seems to have been created in the image and likeness of Hiram Bingham (Robert Young, actor who became famous on TV with an ultra-conservative series "Father Knows Best") is about to open the ancient Inca temple where - of course - is the golden disc that everyone seeks.

KORI TIKA
That is the fictional name of Yma Sumac, who appears in Machu Picchu singing and dancing in the most unlikely moments. She is a descendant of the last Inca, and along with her brother and all the Inca people (500 extras who do not know if they were paid in kind or in gold soles) help the gringo to see if they find the divine sunburst and it to their wonderful empire.

Yma Sumac has some lines that shows her excessive histrionics are best served in the the music instead of the real action. But her numbers are good to show the exotic that we Peruvians are proud of that grace the wonderful music of the Andes. She should be the precursor of the street gangs of panpipes and charango vilified in "South Park" fifty years later. And of course has been the most notable of Dinas, Mechanical and cartoons may not make it to Broadway but at least it to Paterson, New Jersey Victorian branch.

MAP ROOM
The convoluted story - which of course there is a villain who also wants the disc and ends up falling into an Andean cliff as it is for all evil to oppose Harry - ends with a scene that Spielberg also copied shamelessly in the "map room" sequence (though not so original either.) This is the game of mirrors that discovers the true place where the treasure is hidden. When everyone believes that the story was a legend, Harry discovers the mystery. After all it is a piece of a puzzle that shows how to look for the golden sunburst, waiting for the dawn to a mirror to reflect the exact spot where the piece is hidden. This will finally discover the treasure Harry Steele is looking for and which will make him become a millionaire.

Of course, Harry finally realizes that it is better the joy of all the people than for one man and he lets the Peruvians free of their illusions and recover the treasure ... and hope. After all he would still have another treasure: the youth and beauty of Elena Antonescu.

SECRETS OF THE PERUVIAN FICTION
If Harrison Ford is Charlton Heston as Harry Steele as Indiana Jones, I'm wondering why no one has shown. It must be because of Spielberg's fame but the truth is that Harry is a remarkable character but not as likeable as the academic adventurer. Harry displays gross bad manners to women, who all fall rendered to his charms. He knows about the effects of the pisco sours (in fact he lets the Romanian Consul overdose himself), lives in a hotel on the Plaza Rejocigo, speaks Spanish (not bad), uses a gun without fear and knows half of Cusco. All that said Indiana has a fetish: the whip.

Moreover, if there is something to be grateful to Harry and company for, Peru is now a coveted tourist destination. It is impressive to see the hundreds of extras in one's native city of Machu Picchu, a place that tourists did not come to then as Harry made clear to his fictional Romanian - who incidentally is very French: Nicole Maurey. And in that SECRET OF THE INCAS itself is like Indiana Jones, with a cast on display of various nationalities. Even Pachacutec, Kori Tika's brother is an Australian actor (Michael Pate) and a British Colonel Cardoza (Edward Colmans). The latter character is with the researchers in Cusco to prevent the archaeologists leaving with the valuable pieces (sic) shame that in reality there was none to avoid what Yale did years earlier. These are for the "Peruvian" the most important part of the film along with the imposing Yma Sumac - chola pinnacle of power - and not counting those anonymous Indians who seem to enjoy her songs and appear in close-ups showing their cheeks and wide typical costumes - those that are hard to find in the postmodern Cusco.

Today, as Machu Picchu is one of the new seven wonders and the Peruvians have regained pride in our past and seem optimistic about our future, THE SECRET OF THE INCAS is a film to be seen. The cliches abound, true, but remember that Charlton Heston walking proudly around Cusco, and scenery was a very effective propaganda in 1954 to attract tourists. To note the new Ministry of Culture and Promperú, THE SECRET OF THE INCAS sets.
Escuchar
Leer fonéticamente
Special thanks to James Byrne, whose site dedicated to THE SECRET OF THE INCAS was enlightening as well as being fun. Also to youtube and Johnny (los olivos (powder blue)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jul 14, 2016 11:23 am 
Offline
El Cid
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2010 6:11 pm
Posts: 1138
Location: Lincoln, England
http://charltonheston.blogspirit.com/ni ... mes-byrne/

NICOLE MAUREY in conversation with JAMES BYRNE
13 November 2011. Le Chesnay, France.

My special thanks to Fabienne Boullonnois of http://nicole.maurey.viola.net/ for all her help and friendship.
……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

JAMES BYRNE: Hello Nicole, it is a real pleasure to meet you. Can you confirm your exact date of birth, the internet has three different dates, 1 Jan, 15 May, and 20 Dec – all in 1925. Which one is correct?
NICOLE MAUREY: None of them are correct. I was born on 20 December 1926. The studio made me a year older, but what difference does a year matter anyway? I don’t know where the internet got those other dates from.
JAMES BYRNE: Can you tell me about your experiences in the 1940’s of the Nazi occupation of France, and what it was like for a pretty young girl like you at that time?
NICOLE MAUREY: At that time I was not at all getting out because we were educated in a very strict way in the old days and the young girls of fifteen or sixteen were not allowed to go out with friends at night, and they always had to be with their mother or somebody grown up. I don’t really remember anything about that time except we were terribly hungry … we had nothing … really hungry. I remember that vividly, we were not having anything. All we had to eat was vegetables, carrots cooked with water, no butter, ugh! (Nicole laughs) All my friends at Christmas had chicken, but all we had were a few vegatables. After the war I got a little fatter because we were eating like mad, as soon as we could forget the whole thing. Besides that, I never saw any Germans …. Naturally I saw German soldiers walking in the street of course, but it was much as it was before the occupation.
JAMES BYRNE: How did you get the part in BLONDINE, your movie debut?
NICOLE MAUREY: As a child I trained to be a ballet dancer but my bones were not right for it, so I went to stage school. The director came to our school, I was there for maybe a year or six months, I don’t remember, but why he selected me was I had the right age of the part. They were looking for a girl of 15 to 16, all the other girls were 18 and 19, but I have bad memories of the producer, he was a very nasty man. When we made the test there was maybe 10 or 15 girls and he said ‘no make up for her!’ I told the director I was leaving, because the producer did not want me, but he persuaded me to at least get the experience of a screen test, so I stayed. But I have a very bad memory of that man, even though I was bashful when somebody walk on my feet … that’s a French expression … you know …
JAMES BYRNE: That was your first screen kiss Nicole, in BLONDINE?
NICOLE MAUREY: My very first kiss was on film. I told you how strictly we were brought up, I was wearing little socks, a little pleated dress, no make-up at all, and we never went out. Everyone who spoke to me I blushed, and up to then I had never been out with a boy. My first love scene was painful, I was terribly shy and blushed all the time and couldn’t get it right. The director got so mad with me and said ‘Are you or are you not a woman’? I fell so much in love with my leading man Georges Marchal, he was a very handsome man. I would have died for him, he was touched to see someone so much in love with him but he had his own life. I waited for flowers and a letter from Georges but they never came. I was very upset (sighs) oh well! At 16 I was very backward. Nowadays I should think it is unheard of for a girl of that age never to have been kissed or made love to.
JAMES BYRNE: You met Jacques Gallo on the Paris metro, and then married him, Nicole.
NICOLE MAUREY: Not straight away ... he pursued me for a long time until I said yes.
JAMES BYRNE: But it didn't work out. There is a famous photo of Jacques Gallo kissing you on the cheek outside the court after getting your divorce, so you remained friends. http://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0257/3 ... 1462969827
NICOLE MAUREY: Yes, we still were friendly up until his death, but Jacques had no ambition. After I returned home to Paris from America I found out that Jacques Gallo had sold everything, everything. There was nothing left ... all my mementos, clothes, photos, everything, all gone. (At this point Nicole becomes very emotional and starts to sob. When she composes herself, we continue) He was supposed to be studying acting, but he never applied himself, he didn't take it serious. Acting has to be taken serious if you want to succeed. When he began at the acting school he said to me "In two years time I will be bigger than you!"
JAMES BYRNE: Did you get him that small role in LITTLE BOY LOST?
NICOLE MAUREY: Jacques Gallo wasn't in LITTLE BOY LOST, was he?
JAMES BYRNE: He is listed in the cast on IMDb, Nicole.
NICOLE MAUREY: Well, it couldn't have been a big scene he was in .... I don't remember him in that film at all.
JAMES BYRNE: Gallo also made a film with Charlton Heston, like yourself, called THE BUCCANEER.
NICOLE MAUREY: Well, that must have been a very small part
JAMES BYRNE: You worked with the great French director Bresson in DIARY OF A COUNTRY PRIEST, which must have been a daunting experience for you Nicole.
NICOLE MAUREY: Bresson is a big fantastic director but very difficult to work with him because he knew exactly what he wanted to get from you, but didn’t know how to explain or how to arrive at things. So every scene we were making it maybe 15 – 16 – 17 times and every time I had to say “Chantal”, he would say “Oh no, no, that’s too weak, no that’s too strong, no that’s too …. so on and so on. In the end I was saying “Chantal, chantal, chantal, chantal” (Nicole differentiates the tone of every "Chantal"), you didn’t know where you were. He was the only director that made me cry.
JAMES BYRNE: Did that kind of thing happen a lot in Hollywood as well, Nicole, having multiple retakes?
NICOLE MAUREY: In Hollywood we had several takes because always something goes wrong. If it is not the actor, it is something wrong with the camera, or the lighting, or something.
JAMES BYRNE: Did you like Hollywood, Nicole?
NICOLE MAUREY: I liked the American people. I had to make many personal appearences to promote the films, if I make a little joke everyone doubled up laughing as if it were a big one. Like children. It was very nice in America, they made me feel like I’m a great wit. I didn’t like Los Angeles though, it wasn’t a friendly place to live I think. You had to be rich or somebody … a star, a writer, or somebody big in the business like an executive. It wasn’t a place to be poor in.
JAMES BYRNE: Now, my favourite movie is SECRET OF THE INCAS, all your scenes were filmed at Paramount, right?
NICOLE MAUREY: Yes, SECRET OF THE INCAS was just going to be a documentary at first in Peru with a man and a woman but then the scenes they filmed in the documentary were later added to the film.
JAMES BYRNE: Did you know that your ‘double’ in Peru had a completely different hairstyle to you Nicole?
NICOLE MAUREY: But I just told you it was a documentary at first with a man and a woman.
JAMES BYRNE: Yes, but Heston did film a few scenes in Cuzco, and in those scenes the lady playing your role had a much shorter hairstyle than you.
NICOLE MAUREY: No, Heston never went to Peru. He may have gone to Peru later, but not then.
JAMES BYRNE: Honestly Nicole, Heston was flown to Peru and was filmed in certain landmark areas of Cuzco, like the Plaza de Armas. I have hundreds of photos of Heston in Peru.
NICOLE MAUREY: Well you know more about the film than me (laughs) and I haven’t seen SECRET OF THE INCAS for many years. I looked at the first few bits on your website that’s all.

Here to lighten the conversation a bit, I ask Nicole if she would agree to do a bit of the dialogue from SECRET OF THE INCAS ... the famous 'Cherry Tree' scene. Here is a brief extract from it ... after about three attempts. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PhSPcAyCgwE


JAMES BYRNE: In her autobiography French actress Leslie Caron was quite scathing of the director Jerry Hopper, calling him a drunk. How did you get on with Hopper in SECRET OF THE INCAS?
NICOLE MAUREY: Jerry Hopper was very nice to me, he was totally professional. I never saw him drinking once on the set. Leslie Caron was always, how you say, maybe a little bit above herself.
JAMES BYRNE: I have loads of publicity stills of you, Charlton Heston and Robert Young larking about on the set. Was it as happy as it looked behind the scenes?
NICOLE MAUREY: Yes it was very pleasant. I will tell you a funny story about Charlton Heston. One day during a break in rehearsals we were talking about actors superstitions in different countries. Well, in my country France there is one flower that you cannot send to an actor because it is bad luck. I didn’t speak English very well in those days, and I didn’t know the name of the flower in English, and I was trying to explain it’s like a rose, its as well known as a rose, and the smell is good, etc. We finished on that. The next day I received a big, big, bouquet of carnations, very beautiful with blue, white and red carnations, the colours of the French flag, from Charlton Heston. These were the flowers that bring bad luck to an actor. I said in my head, oh my God, I daren’t tell Charlton Heston. I couldn’t bring them into my dressing room and left them outside at the door, but I took them home at night. I never told Charlton Heston that they were the flowers that bring bad luck.
JAMES BYRNE: Why are French actors superstitious of carnations?
NICOLE MAUREY: Moliere, have you heard of him? he was a great French playwright and actor, he had a troupe of actors who toured the country. At the end of the year, or at the end of the tour, the actors who were signed again for the next tour received roses, but the actors he did not want again received carnations. Do you see why no French actor wants to receive carnations?
JAMES BYRNE: In England you cannot say “Good luck” to an actor before he goes onto the stage, you have to say “Break a leg!” and never mention Macbeth in a British theatre, actors only ever mention it as “The Scottish play”.
NICOLE MAUREY: You see, every country has different theatrical superstitions. In France, dark green and bottle green are considered very unlucky. My grandmother was a terribly superstitious woman and as long as she was alive no one in the family would wear green. It was the colour that suited me best, but I never felt happy wearing it.
JAMES BYRNE: Yma Sumac has always been a bit of an enigma, how did you and Yma get on?
NICOLE MAUREY: Yma Sumac was very reserved. She arrived on the set every day, did what she had to do on the film, but never mixed with the rest of the crew. She mostly stayed in her dressing room. I admired her 7 octaves, an incredible voice.
JAMES BYRNE: Yma Sumac only had 5 octaves Nicole.
NICOLE MAUREY: No! (laughs) I told everyone it was 7.
JAMES BYRNE: Yma Sumac was having serious problems at the time you were all filming SECRET OF THE INCAS, Nicole, maybe that will explain her aloof behaviour. Her husband was having an affair with their housemaid, and he got her pregnant.
Did you ever meet Walter Winchell?
NICOLE MAUREY: No … who was he?
JAMES BYRNE: He was the top gossip columnist of the McCarthy era in America then, he could make or break you in a single sentence. He also started the rumour that Yma Sumac was Amy Camus. In January 1955 Winchell wrote a bit of gossip about you and Lance Fuller being an item. Was that true?
NICOLE MAUREY: Who is Lance Fuller, is he an actor? I never heard of him. In America scandal is news. Once, a reporter asked me who I was dating. I tell him no-one, I don’t date when I work. The next day he came again and said ‘Who did you date last night’? Again I told him I do not date when I am working. He couldn’t understand that my life was as ordinary as anyone else’s. In Hollywood they couldn’t believe it because I refused to wear a bathing suit getting off a plane in New York. It was very cold so I refused. They said I had to do something unusual like that to get on the front page because Grace Kelly was getting married in Monaco. In Hollywood they were more interested in glamour poses than your acting ability. I tell them that just because I’m French, you can’t do this to me. But they insisted. Just before I filmed SECRET OF THE INCAS the publicity men at Paramount asked my bust measurements. I startled them when I said it was 93, but I had to explain to them I was using centimetres. They wrote down roughly 37 inches. They asked about French men … I said that French men prefer blondes but usually marry brunettes. Blondes are for pleasure.
JAMES BYRNE: Well that clears that one up! (laughs) Lance Fuller was an actor who made movies like THIS ISLAND EARTH. Multi Oscar winner Edith Head designed the costumes for SECRET OF THE INCAS, what was she like?
NICOLE MAUREY: Edith Head was not on the set of SECRET OF THE INCAS, well I never saw her anyway. Two of her assistants looked after me. I met Edith Head on other movies though, like THE JAYHAWKERS. She was absolutely professional in every way, everything had to be just so.
JAMES BYRNE: In an American newspaper in 1954, it states that you were dubbed in SECRET OF THE INCAS, is that true Nicole?
NICOLE MAUREY: No, obviously you have to re-dub some scenes because the voice is not strong enough or something, but that is my voice on the screen.
JAMES BYRNE: You played a prostitute on the run from communist tyranny in SECRET OF THE INCAS …
NICOLE MAUREY: I played a Romanian refugee. A refugee is not a prostitute!
JAMES BYRNE: I know! (laughs). You played a refugee who was forced into prostitution in La Paz to pay your way to Cuzco.
NICOLE MAUREY: Did I? (laughs) I don’t remember, it’s a long time ago. I will have to watch it all on your site.
JAMES BYRNE: You were definitely a prostitute in your next picture THE BOLD AND THE BRAVE.
NICOLE MAUREY: That was my favourite film and my best performance. My agent told me to turn it down because the money offered wasn’t even as much as the expenses they give you on other films. But I wanted to do it because my part was well written. There was no money in the film, a very small crew, and just a few in the cast. I remember I had a very emotional scene with Don Taylor and at the end the crew all stood and applauded me for a few minutes. It gave me a wonderful memory of that moment, I nearly cried.
JAMES BYRNE: You and Don Taylor worked well together, I liked those scenes in the movie the best.
NICOLE MAUREY: Don Taylor was on the set one day and he asked me if we could rehearse our big scene together that night just to get a feel of it. I of course agreed because it was a very emotional and highly charged scene. Anyway, it soon became obvious after a while the real reason why he wanted to ‘rehearse’, and I told him firmly that I am not that type of woman to go to bed with a man just like that, and after I had told him that, do you know what he said to me ….“Your place or mine?”
JAMES BYRNE: (Roars laughing) How about Wendell Corey, what was he like to work with? He was drinking heavy at the time .
NICOLE MAUREY: Very quiet, very nice man.
JAMES BYRNE: Did you know that he was supposed to play Harry Steele in SECRET OF THE INCAS?
NICOLE MAUREY: Really?
JAMES BYRNE: Yes, and then they chose Heston for the part. Wendell Corey was then downgraded to play second lead Dr Stanley Moorehead, but then he lost that to Robert Young. He wasn't very happy at the parts he was being offered and when his role as the archaeologist shrunk in the constant re-writes Corey refused to do it. He pleaded to do a Broadway play, "His and Hers," but Paramount refused to release him.
NICOLE MAUREY: Robert Young was the nicest gentleman, he was lovely, the nicest man in Hollywood.
JAMES BYRNE: Did you know that Robert Young later suffered from severe depression and tried to commit suicide?
NICOLE MAUREY: No! (Nicole is shocked) are you sure?
JAMES BYRNE: Yes, its a documented fact. After years of depression he tried to end it all in 1991. He attached a hose to his exhaust pipe but couldn't start the engine so he rang a garage for help The guy saw the hose and phoned the police. Thankfully, Robert recovered from his depression and years later had a hospital named after him for all his charity work in that field.
JAMES BYRNE: What is your opinion of SECRET OF THE INCAS Nicole?
NICOLE MAUREY: It was a beautiful role but they started the film without a finished script. They hadn’t even written the ending and every day the script seemed to change. You learned your lines but then they changed them the next day. The ending of the film changed several times, they didn’t know how to end it. I liked SECRET OF THE INCAS but THE BOLD AND THE BRAVE is my favourite. The scenes were stronger, more emotionally challenging to me as an actress.
JAMES BYRNE: Catholicism runs through your early movies, even the Italian prostitute in THE BOLD AND THE BRAVE was a Catholic.
NICOLE MAUREY: (looks puzzled) How do you know that she was a Catholic, James?
JAMES BYRNE: You had a crucifix on your wall. Are you, like me, a Catholic, Nicole?
NICOLE MAUREY: Yes, but I don't go to Mass anymore. The priests asked me very personal questions when I went to confession, and I haven't been since. Even at funerals they put no feeling into the words they are speaking about the deceased. I am an actress, and without feeling, words mean nothing. I still have God in my heart, though, the Catholic faith never really leaves you.
JAMES BYRNE: Bing Crosby visited you on the set while he was filming WHITE CHRISTMAS, so you were obviously still good friends after LITTLE BOY LOST. He once described you as a combination of Rita Hayworth, Marlene Dietrich and the farmer’s daughter.
NICOLE MAUREY: Yes, Bing Crosby was a nice man, very relaxed. In France, so many of the big stars were so high-hat. They weren’t like that in Hollywood. Bing and I were good friends, and he always treated me very well. Bing was wonderful.
JAMES BYRNE: His son Gary didn't think so. He wrote a book attacking his father's brutal ways and afterwards commited suicide. Two of his sons from Bing's first marriage killed themselves.
NICOLE MAUREY: (Gasps in shock) I never knew that at all. I cannot believe it!
JAMES BYRNE: In his will Crosby stipulated that his children couldn't touch their inheritance until they reached the age of 65 - which three of them didn't unfortunately.
NICOLE MAUREY: That was a terrible thing to do. You know a lot more than me, James, but all I remember of working with Bing Crosby was how kind and friendly he was to me.
JAMES BYRNE: You made a western with Jeff Chandler in the States, THE JAYHAWKERS, which has now achieved cult status in France because of its many references to Napoleon.
NICOLE MAUREY: What I remember most about THE JAYHAWKERS is the fight I had with Henry Silva. He was throwing me around, grabbing me so brutally. By the end of the day I was covered in bruises. Henry Silva took it very seriously.
JAMES BYRNE: Another cult movie you starred in was THE DAY OF THE TRIFFIDS.
NICOLE MAUREY: On the set Howard Keel teased me about my French accent, especially the way I pronounced “chewing gum”. From then on he always called me “Miss chewing gum”. I couldn’t believe what I was seeing during one scene when the trees are attacking. I thought it was ridiculous, really ridiculous. What are the audience going to make of this I thought, a man in a tree costume. It looked very ridiculous. What will the audience think?
JAMES BYRNE: That’s why it’s a cult classic Nicole, all those fans of that era like that kind of thing.
NICOLE MAUREY: I don’t know why. Most of the mail I get from all over the world, England and America particularly, they all want autographs from THE DAY OF THE TRIFFIDS. That’s all they ask about.
JAMES BYRNE: No one asks about SECRET OF THE INCAS then?
NICOLE MAUREY: Some do but every day in the post its THE DAY OF THE TRIFFIDS. They ask questions about it but I can’t even get a copy of the film to see it. I remember filming it but can’t remember the film, do you understand? I would like to see it again. You should be able to get a copy in England James, that’s where it was made after all. I haven’t seen it since it was released.
JAMES BYRNE: Its deleted in England Nicole, but I ordered a copy from America for you and as soon as it arrives I’ll send it on. There is a great photo of you greeting our Queen Elizabeth, what was that occasion?
NICOLE MAUREY: It was at the premiere of ME AND THE COLONEL on 27 October 1958. There was Curt Jurgens next to me and Frank Sinatra the other side. Curt Jurgens was a nasty man. He was very German … do you know what I mean? Everybody on the set loved Danny Kaye, he was such a darling man, he greeted all the crew every day and made everybody laugh. He was never miserable, was always joking around and of course everyone liked him. I loved Danny Kaye.
JAMES BYRNE: You loved Danny Kaye?
NICOLE MAUREY: Yes, we had one particular scene together (Nicole shows me a photo of the scene) and I fell in love with him at that moment. Curt Jurgens didn’t like it that everyone loved Danny Kaye and in our love scene together he grabbed me so hard that I got mad and said “What are you doing, you are supposed to be making love to me?” I think he was put out by the fact that Danny Kaye was getting all the attention on the set. I didn’t like Curt Jurgens at all, a very surly man.
JAMES BYRNE: In England you made THE SCAPEGOAT with two greats, Alec Guinness and Bette Davis.
NICOLE MAUREY: Did you know that Alec Guinness was homosexual? Well, he did not know how to kiss a girl on screen properly. He was a very, shy, quiet man, and had never kissed a girl before the cameras. I had to teach him how to kiss a woman. He was a lovely man, very gentle and well mannered – and a wonderful actor. Bette Davis was highly professional and word perfect. No mistakes. She didn’t mix with me very much. Years later I was watching television and I saw this terribly wrinkled , very thin old lady … and I couldn’t believe it was Bette Davis … I don’t know how she got to look like that … she looked terrible.
JAMES BYRNE: I think she was a chain smoker Nicole. Another great British star you filmed with was the comedian Terry-Thomas in HIS AND HERS. What was he like on the set, comedians have a reputation for being sad clowns in their personal life.
NICOLE MAUREY: Terry-Thomas was a very amusing man, he made everyone laugh, he was very witty, and he was exactly the same as he is on the screen. In one scene he turned up very drunk, he could hardly speak his lines, it was very funny, I don’t know how we managed to finish the scene, but eventually we did. We laughed a lot on that film. I had to pretend to be drunk, and at the end of the day I felt really drunk, even though I was not drinking alcohol. I put so much into it that I really did feel drunk.
JAMES BYRNE: I really like a wonderful little comedy you made in England with Rex Harrison called THE CONSTANT HUSBAND, Nicole, particularly the scene when you physically and verbally attack Rex Harrison. You looked gorgeous, and displayed real fire and passion as the sexy Italian Lola, you certainly didn’t hold anything back in that scene.
NICOLE MAUREY: It is true that I put all my strength into attacking Rex Harrison, so much that he screamed at the director “Stop this woman, she is going to kill me!” I thought he was very strong, so I really pushed him with all my strength and I was very surprised to find him so light, because he really fly over the room. Rex Harrison was off the set with an illness afterwards and the crew jokingly blamed me for it. That was a nice working experience, we all got on very well.
JAMES BYRNE: I'm surprised at that Nicole, Rex Harrison was supposed to be a nightmare to work with, even Heston and him were at odds with each other. Stanley Holloway told a funny story about Harrison on a chat show in England. They were appearing in MY FAIR LADY on the London stage and a little old lady was always at the stage door asking for Harrison's autograph. As Rex came through the door she approached him for yet another autograph." Oh get out of my way you silly woman!" he hissed, brushing past her. With that she began hitting Harrison with her brolly, just as Holloway came out. Seeing this commotion, Holloway quipped, "Well that's a first - the fan hitting the shit." (Nicole is not at all amused by this story, and raises her right eyebrow and gives me a stern look).
JAMES BYRNE: Another movie you made in England and on location in Holland was the thriller THE HOUSE OF THE SEVEN HAWKS with Robert Taylor.
NICOLE MAUREY: All through the filming of THE HOUSE OF THE SEVEN HAWKS Robert Taylor was very charming but reserved. Every night after shooting, we would all go together for dinner, the producer and his wife, the director, the cameraman, etc. …. but not Robert Taylor … he just got married and he was afraid of the newpapermen who were terrible at inventing stories, just to make interesting stories for their papers. He was afraid that if he was seen with me, that they would want a story, “historie” in French, saying that there was a love affair between us, etc. etc.
JAMES BYRNE: Nicole, as well as all those films in Hollywood, Argentina and Europe, and countless tv movies, you appeared regularly on the stage in Paris. Did you ever suffer the stage actor’s bugbear of ‘stage fright’ or forgetting your lines?
NICOLE MAUREY: For many, many years I had a nightmare, I was on stage and couldn’t remember my lines. This happened quite a lot, it was a recurring dream and I was always worried about it. Then, one night on stage it happened, I forgot my lines. The other actors were whispering my lines to me but I couldn’t understand them , it was just like (Nicole makes a barely audible whispering noise). Then, all of a sudden, the lines came back into my head, just like that. You know, the nightmares stopped as well, I never got them ever again. I never forgot my lines ever again, but if I go on stage now I might. I couldn’t remember all those lines now, I think I am too old to go on the stage now.
JAMES BYRNE: I’ve had a wonderful day with Nicole, thank you for the lunch and for your hospitality.
NICOLE MAUREY: All the very best to you James, I liked meeting you. How are you enjoying Paris?
JAMES BYRNE: I love the tourist sites, very spectacular, but some of the locals aren’t too nice. Whenever I ask anyone if they speak English, I got a stern “No!” in reply.
NICOLE MAUREY: That’s exactly what happened to me when I first went to England in the 1950’s.
JAMES BYRNE: The only ones who were nice to me were some prostitutes at the Moulin Rouge!
NICOLE MAUREY: (Bursts out laughing) You have already been with some prostitutes?
JAMES BYRNE: (More hysterical laughter) No! I was asking everyone for directions to my hotel, and they were the only ones who pointed me in the right direction, so to speak.


Last edited by James Byrne on Mon Dec 05, 2016 9:15 am, edited 10 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Secret of the Incas
PostPosted: Thu Jul 14, 2016 12:00 pm 
Offline
El Cid
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2010 6:11 pm
Posts: 1138
Location: Lincoln, England
http://charltonheston.blogspirit.com/ar ... 70533.html

FRASER HESTON in conversation with JAMES BYRNE.
(6-12 May 2008)


JAMES BYRNE: I love a movie you wrote and produced, MOTHER LODE, in which your father also directed and starred in. The plot – about a group of adventurers searching for the Mother Lode in a secret cavern – has slight elements of the SECRET OF THE INCAS plot. My children pointed out to me that the beginning of MOTHER LODE, the tough guy hero in the aeroplane flying over the terrific scenery, resembled Harry Steele flying over the Andes. Fraser, did watching any of your father’s old adventure movies from the 1950’s influence you at all when writing MOTHER LODE?


FRASER HESTON: Thanks James, much appreciated. I’m sure there are some unintentional similarities – MOTHER LODE’s a treasure hunt film after all, but I made no conscious effort to emulate anything from INCAS – more like a homage to another great treasure hunt film (the greatest ever): TREASURE OF THE SIERRA MADRE.

JAMES BYRNE: I agree with you, TREASURE OF THE SIERRA MADRE is the greatest treasure hunt movie of them all. Here’s an interesting little titbit I noticed when watching the Bogey classic. Fred C. Dobbs’ final words are “Burro, burro,” coincidently the first words spoken by Chuck Heston in SECRET OF THE INCAS, and the sunburst seekers in Incas are very similar to the SIERRA MADRE treasure hunters. Maybe the INCAS screenwriters were slightly influenced by the Bogey movie, who knows? As a screenwriter, producer and director, do you think it’s tempting to ‘pop in’ little homages to old classics as part of the plot of your own movie?

FRASER HESTON: I don’t think this happens as much as film critics allege – homages (or rip-offs as they are more often called) probably happen inadvertently as often as not, or subconsciously, thinking “Wouldn’t it be cool if this happened …” but forgetting you saw it in some other film first! Obviously there are exceptions, obvious homages and spoofs, but mostly we’re desperately working away, trying to come up with something original!

JAMES BYRNE: Most people who venture to Peru go on the ‘Inca Trail’, but I was slightly different, I went on the ‘Harry Steele Trail’, and made a point of touring all the locations seen in SECRET OF THE INCAS. Did you visit any of the places in Cuzco that Harry Steele hung out in the movie when you visited Peru, Fraser?

FRASER HESTON: Yes. I visited Cuzco, Sacsayhuaman, and Machu Picchu. I also travelled up the Amazon, by plane, river steamer (think FITZCARRALDO), motorized canoe and a dugout from Belem at the mouth up to Iquitos, and then eventually aways up the Ucayali, and then came to the Urubamba (below Machu Picchu) by train. Had a blast.

JAMES BYRNE: Sounds terrific Fraser. You also climbed Huayna Picchu at Machu Picchu, it sure looked a daunting prospect to me as I stood at the foot of it … was it as dangerous as it looked?

FRASER HESTON: I didn’t think it was all that dangerous, but there is certainly some exposure when you climb through a little cave, and pop out onto an airy little traverse overlooking the Urubamba valley about a thousand feet below. Nothing of any technical difficulty however and well worth the effort. I also got locked into the ruins after hours when I lost track of time in the fog. Security guard found me and turfed me out. Very cool experience.

JAMES BYRNE: Wow! The son of Harry Steele lost in the ruins of Machu Picchu! Fraser, your mother is an accomplished photographer and often went on location with her husband, including Peru for SECRET OF THE INCAS, and took some terrific shots. Has she ever considered writing a book … and using all those great behind-the-scenes location photos she took over the years?

FRASER HESTON: I have often been asked, “Your life was like Indiana Jones – one adventure after another – was it your father who inspired your adventures?” In fact, I say, it was my mother who was Indiana Jones, who dragged us up all those pyramids from Sacarra to Chichen Itza, ruin-running from Hadrian’s Wall to the Acropolis, museum marching from the British Museum to the Met. She’s published a couple of books, several photo shows and retrospectives, and is still going strong, at 84.

JAMES BYRNE: She’s a great lady, Fraser. For many years now, fans of SECRET OF THE INCAS have been literally begging for its release onto video and dvd. Have you any idea why Paramount won’t release this wonderful movie?

FRASER HESTON: I agree! I’m not sure Paramount is resisting releasing that, per se, but they’ve got a lot of old films (thousands in fact!) and I suppose eventually they’ll get around to releasing all of them. Let’s hope INCAS is sooner than later!

JAMES BYRNE: I would like to congratulate you on your marvellous version of TREASURE ISLAND. It must have been a daunting prospect bringing a different variation on an oft-filmed classic. I notice that your adaptation is more realistic than the other movies, in particular the Disney version. Any thoughts on the making of this film?

FRASER HESTON: Thanks – another treasure hunt movie if there ever was one: and the best pirate story ever. And my favourite book – my dad read it to me dozens of times from the age of five! We tried to make this the most faithful to the book, and the most real, gritty version, with authentic sea faring stuff (we used the H.M.S. Bounty, provided by Ted Turner who got it from MGM) and pirates who would sooner cut your throat than look at you. Did we succeed?

JAMES BYRNE: Yes Fraser, you more than succeeded in making the pirates in TREASURE ISLAND look far more realistic than in the earlier versions. You got great performances from your father as Long John Silver and Oliver Reed as Billy Bones. In fact, all the cast really did look like gin-soaked nasty sea-dogs, particularly Reed and Pete Postlethwait. Ollie Reed had a bit of a reputation over here in England as being ‘very thirsty’. Did Ollie behave himself on the set … was he easy to work with?

FRASER HESTON: Thanks for the compliment. I loved directing TREASURE ISLAND with dad – a childhood fantasy come true. Oliver, in the event, though we were concerned at first, behaved himself very well, and delivered a stunning performance in my opinion. Though he could booze with the best of them, and eventually and tragically drank himself to death, as I understand it, he was professional with us at all times. We had a great cast in that film, including Christian Bale (who came all the way across America just to attend my father’s memorial) Christopher Lee, Julian Glover, Pete Postlethwait and of course Ollie, and not to mention Charlton Heston. It was a director’s dream come true and I was like a kid in the candy store with all those wonderful English actors. It’d be honoured to work with any of ‘em again in a heartbeat.

JAMES BYRNE: Yes, TREASURE ISLAND is a great movie. The opening scene of SECRET OF THE INCAS, as the llama herder plays a flute and the camera pans around the beautiful scenery, with the sultry voice of Yma Sumac singing an Inca folk song really created an instant feeling of an exotic adventure movie. The same with your version of TREASURE ISLAND, that terrific opening shot of Oliver Reed in the boat, with the salty, sea-faring music … it’s a really atmospheric scene that instantly gets the viewer into a swashbuckling frame of mind. Did you choose that fabulous music yourself, Fraser?

FRASER HESTON: Yes James, the music from TREASURE ISLAND was by Paddy Maloney and The Chieftains, throughout the film – we had a great time recording with them in Dublin. They were just a gut feeling I had about the right music and it played out handsomely, I thought. You can download the TREASURE ISLAND score on iTunes, under The Chieftains album, Reel Music, I believe (see also http://www.thechieftains.com/discograph ... lmusic.asp) along with some other cool Chieftains scores, like The Grey Fox and Barry Lyndon. They did a great job for us and really caught that 18th Century, West Country buccaneer flavour.

JAMES BYRNE: What is your favourite Charlton Heston movie … and why?

FRASER HESTON: Two of them: BEN-HUR because it’s an amazing film, and stands up very well today. Just incredible. And WILL PENNY – a little western dad made up in the High Sierra, where I will spread some of his ashes in a few weeks, because it’s a hell of a movie and one of my dad’s personal favourites.

JAMES BYRNE: Fraser, you appeared as the infant Moses in THE TEN COMMANDMENTS, which is one of my family’s favourite movies. Obviously, you won’t be able to remember a single thing about making the movie, but did you ever meet any of the stars of the movie when you were older … and if so, what did they say to you?

FRASER HESTON: I’m sure I must have met Yul Brynner when I was very young, but don’t recall what he said. I did meet Cecil B. De Mille later (I’m the youngest actor in his last film as a director, and therefore, I am probably the last actor to ever work with DeMille). Here’s a photo for you – the inscription reads:
“To a fine young actor in a gripping situation. From his director, - Cecil B. DeMille. All three of us made THE TEN COMMANDMENTS.”

JAMES BYRNE: Great photo, Fraser. Thanks for your time and co-operation, and good luck to you in the future.


Last edited by James Byrne on Fri Jul 29, 2016 1:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Secret of the Incas
PostPosted: Sat Jul 16, 2016 2:14 am 
Offline
Damned Dirty Admin
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 01, 2010 7:18 pm
Posts: 2636
Location: Sweden
James Byrne wrote:
Yes Thorn. My website on SECRET OF THE INCAS, http://www.secretoftheincas.co.uk, was deleted on 25 May 2016 while I was on holiday in London. As you know, the webmaster and I had a serious disagreement a couple of years ago which was never fully resolved. I came back from London and telephoned him about paying the annual fee, but he was extremely busy preparing for his daughter's wedding and then the site was wiped.

I know that you have recently moved house and have a young son, so probably won't have the time to put my site on this forum (assuming that you still have it, that is), so don't worry if you can't. It was just a suggestion, Thorn.

I definitely still have it, don't worry about that, James :)

I am pretty sure you can still pay the fee for the site and it would be up and running again. I don't believe they just delete everything on it with no back-up, as I'm sure others have been late with payment and it wouldn't be good customer service to have the website makers do it all over again.

Do you think you could see if it is possible still in existence, but put on hold in the World Wide Web?

_________________
Image
You know, McKay, you're a bigger fool than I thought you were. And to tell you the truth, that just didn't seem possible.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Secret of the Incas
PostPosted: Sat Jul 16, 2016 10:26 am 
Offline
El Cid
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2010 6:11 pm
Posts: 1138
Location: Lincoln, England
I had a bad accident and have been off work for three weeks, but I am returning tomorrow, so if I bump into the webmaster I'll ask him about it, Thorn. I said the same thing as you when I rang him about paying the fee, but when the site was wiped the next day, all he said to me was, "That's it .... it's floating around cyberspace never to return!" so that was the end of our conversation.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Secret of the Incas
PostPosted: Fri Jul 29, 2016 12:57 pm 
Offline
El Cid
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2010 6:11 pm
Posts: 1138
Location: Lincoln, England
I am flying to Colombia for three weeks in a couple of days time, and so watched the old Stewart Granger and Grace Kelly movie GREEN FIRE just to get me in the mood. It was actually filmed in Colombia, and I couldn't help noticing how many similarities this adventure movie shares with SECRET OF THE INCAS.

Both were released within months of each other in 1954
Both have South American settings, Colombia and Peru
Both have Soldiers of Fortune falling out over gold and a pretty woman
Both have excellent location footage
There are musical interludes in both movies
There are local native customs recorded on film
And both films have exactly the same ending

SPOILERS AHEAD!

Last reel of SECRET OF THE INCAS:
Charlton Heston, after much derring-do, hands back the jewelled Sunburst to the Quechuan community at Machu Picchu, foresaking immense wealth for the love of a beautiful woman. Then, in the very last scene, he produces a priceless pin shawl from his pocket and says dryly to Nicole Maurey, "It must have fallen into my pocket!"

Last reel of GREEN FIRE:
Stewart Granger, after much derring-do, foresakes immense riches from the emarald mine for the love of a beautiful woman. Then, in the very last scene, he produces some priceless emaralds from his pocket and says dryly to Grace Kelly, "For our dowry!"

What is also very interesting to fans of Charlton Heston is that the final scene in GREEN FIRE has virtually the same ending of THE NAKED JUNGLE as well. Granger staggering towards Grace Kelly in the pouring rain after blowing up the mountain in the Colombian jungle is very Hestonish, and to cap it all, Granger is geared out in exactly the same macho jungle costume as Heston in THE NAKED JUNGLE. And if that wasn't enough, and which has been noted by countless fans and reviewers, THE NAKED JUNGLE is also remarkably similar to ELEPHANT WALK (Abraham Sofaer actually says the same lines in both these films!). The cinema-goers of 1954 may have had a feeling of deja vue if they went to back to back showings of GREEN FIRE, SECRET OF THE INCAS, THE NAKED JUNGLE and ELEPHANT WALK. Even the same character actors crop up in these adventure movies. Rofolfo Hoyos plays Manuel, the Hotel Manager in SECRET OF THE INCAS, and he's Pedro the Bartender in GREEN FIRE. Robert Tafur, who was born in Colombia, has a very prominent role as Father Ripero in the Granger flick, but his role as the archaelogist Dr. Carlos Mendez was heavily edited in the Heston Inca film. You can just glimpse him briefly in the Indiana Jones type sequence in the cave. This scene also has that fabulous character actor Martin Garralaga as Dr. Cesar Perez, but his role is much bigger in GREEN FIRE, as Gonzales, involved in a local gambling competition with Stewart Granger.

I've seen a few Stewart Granger movies, and Heston could have played some of the same characters in those movies, like KING SOLOMON'S MINES, SALOME and SODOM AND GOMORRAH. But Granger couldn't have played Moses, Ben-Hur or El Cid as well as Heston, that is for sure.

I'll be off-line for three weeks, and I'm really looking forward to travelling to Colombia.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 838 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81 ... 84  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron

suspicion-preferred