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 Post subject: Re: Secret of the Incas
PostPosted: Sat Mar 07, 2015 12:44 pm 
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El Cid
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Yes Thorn, hopefully only a temporary blip.

I had to completely wipe all the messages on my website a while back because of some troll that kept posting offensive stuff, which was a great shame, to lose all those informative posts.


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 Post subject: Re: Secret of the Incas
PostPosted: Sun Mar 08, 2015 1:30 pm 
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El Cid
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James Byrne wrote:
James Byrne wrote:
DIAMOND HEAD is one of many Heston movies that contain incestuous overtones.


SECRET OF THE INCAS is another Heston movie that falls into that category. Can anyone name the others?


Talking about Heston movies with incestuous overtones, sometimes the plot of his plays were a bit iffy. On 24 February 1960 Heston starred on Broadway in THE TUMBLER. The plot: Returning from her wanderings around the world, Lennie (Rosemary Harris) takes refuge from a storm in a barn, where she is seduced by Kell (Charlton Heston). He turns out to be her stepfather, whom her mother (Martha Scott) married hastily after her father's mysterious death. Within a day, Lennie has driven Kell to hang himself.

Apart from seducing his stepdaughter in the play, Heston was married to Martha Scott for the second time, who played his mother twice, in THE TEN COMMANDMENTS and BEN-HUR. Martha had previously played his wife on Broadway in DESIGN FOR A STAINED GLASS WINDOW.

There can't be many other actresses who played both mother and wife to an actor ... twice!


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 Post subject: Re: Secret of the Incas
PostPosted: Mon Mar 16, 2015 2:32 pm 
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El Cid
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J. Arthur Krank wrote:
This has got to be my favourite version, the cleavage quotient is fully maxed, and it has burning helicopters . What else do you need ?


J. Arthur Krank deleted this photo for some reason, but I just stumbled upon it again.

http://www.bloopers.it/testo/index.php? ... &Lettera=S


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 Post subject: Re: Secret of the Incas
PostPosted: Wed Mar 18, 2015 7:41 am 
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El Cid
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I thought I would update some statistics on this SOTI board.

Up to pages 1 - 67 there are 670 posts. Here is the breakdown of the posters

James Byrne - 390
Detective Thorn - 117
itsjudah24 - 76
Tizzyd - 30
Chrysagon - 18
GeorgeForeman69 - 16
MosesSteele - 6
CHfan - 4
J. Arthur Krank - 4 (he deleted one but it still shows in one of my replies)
thegoldenage3060 - 2
Emmm - 2
Betterside - 2
Ed Bannon - 1
Fendell - 1
Ladyhawke - 1


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 Post subject: Re: Secret of the Incas
PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2015 2:51 pm 
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Prince Judah
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James Byrne wrote:
[

There can't be many other actresses who played both mother and wife to an actor ... twice!


This is interesting, Chuck himself mentioned it in his autobiography. I am reminded of a famous Indian actress, Nargis Dutt, who played both mother and wife to Sunil Dutt, and also married him. They were a happy and well-respected star-couple.

_________________
Image

I know this Man!


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 Post subject: Re: Secret of the Incas
PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2015 5:34 pm 
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El Cid
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If you google "Yma Sumac brawl" you will see lots of interesting photos of that infamous fight she had with her husband and staff. Damon Devine, her faithful carer and companion for the last decade of her life, posted this two days ago on the Facebook "The Spell of Yma Sumac" site.

21 March at 23:50
The infamous "Yma Sumac Brawl' was not for publicity, of that we an be sure. The LAST thing a mysterious Inca Princess needs is domestic problems all caught of tape and still photo. So let me explain how the cameras got there and what happened.
The Sumac-Vivanco household was in shambles, as a major divorce was taking place. It seems Yma left (which is strange, because she is clearly the one who paid for the house and everything in it). She returned a few days later to pick up some of her things. In her naive mind, she felt if reporters came along with she and her attorneys, that 'at last the world will get to see what kind of a man I married!' In Hollywood, it doesn't quite work like that. They crave the sensational. This all backfired terribly.
She arrived (which can be seen on Youtube I think, and definitely on my DVD called 'Yma Sumac: The French Documentary') and immediately trouble started. Her dancers (which reporters called her "maids") lived in the house because one was related to her (a cousin). To Sumac's shock the dancers went AGAINST her once they saw the reporters. That betrayal stunned her and sent her into a blind rage. They would be penniless in South America if it weren't for her. She slapped the loudest one (Esmila Zavallos of Peru) and yanked the other (Cholita Rivero of Bolivia and Sumac's cousin) all over the living room. Soon, the husband was having a punching fest with the attorneys, Sumac was bruised and clawing at the ladies and even the dog, Prince, got involved!
The public got to see that the mysterious beauty (despite full makeup and a gorgeous Chinese dress and mink coat!) had similar problems to their own. That did not work in the Diva's favor.
She divorced, (in extraordinary attire and perfect makeup) soon after. Esmila was sent back to Peru immediately and would remain a lifelong enemy. There is a REASON Cholita got to stay..but I probably shouldn't put that here. Let's just say she had a bigger "investment" in the household. One about 8 years old at the time...). Vivanco managed to convince Sumac her music could not survive without him and she kept him in her life as a conductor for a rather miserable 7 more years.


Last edited by James Byrne on Wed Jan 20, 2016 3:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Secret of the Incas
PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2015 5:36 pm 
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El Cid
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Location: Lincoln, England
itsjudah24 wrote:
James Byrne wrote:
[

There can't be many other actresses who played both mother and wife to an actor ... twice!


This is interesting, Chuck himself mentioned it in his autobiography. I am reminded of a famous Indian actress, Nargis Dutt, who played both mother and wife to Sunil Dutt, and also married him. They were a happy and well-respected star-couple.


Hey, thanks for that very interesting information Judah. I bet that there aren't many more though!


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 Post subject: Re: Secret of the Incas
PostPosted: Tue Mar 24, 2015 10:53 am 
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El Cid
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[quote="James Byrne"]I just thought that some of you might not know who William Henry is. If you look at Bill Henry in the SECRET OF THE INCAS photo http://movie-dude.co.uk/William%20Henry.htm and then compare it to Ben Johnson in MIGHTY JOE YOUNG

has also noticed that William Henry is the image of Ben Johnson ... only he enquires if it is Ben Johnson!

Here is his message-

HotshotGTar (21 March 2015)

These old flicks always incorporated great supporting character actors : Thomas Mitchell , Leon Askin and the others. Mitchell at the pool table looks like he had got in a fight with a wad of flying moose **** ! (and lost). It's like they used everyone who happened to be hanging around the studio when they made the film. Michael Pate looks like he just got off the train from Whoville (the hat). Is that a very young Ben Johnson (Think "The Wild Bunch" and "Major Dundee").

If you've ever noticed there is always a drinking scene in a lot of these older flicks. It is said that the world was a better place when everyone in the U.S., was drunk. The government actually functioned as both sides would get together in a bar and get drunk and work things out. I don't know if that's true but it seems to hold some validity by comparison. Prohibition actually helped as it was a lot more fun getting drunk when it was illegal (a possible argument against legalizing pot). Either way keep an eye out for the mandatory bar scenes in movies . Back then everyone could relate to having that experience. If you go by the movies ; it seems like people were drunk or half drunk all the time. It was also symbolic of a "real man" to be slamming down whiskies on a regular basis. My how times have changed. If I drank that much I'd be in perpetual rehab. Think of Iron Man flying around smashed (no pun)., Same goes for smoking which has become such a tabu now , it goes without saying.

"Who cut down the cherry tree ? " ; Is that some kind of code ? ....for *** ?


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 Post subject: Re: Secret of the Incas
PostPosted: Sat Mar 28, 2015 10:43 am 
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El Cid
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I found an excellent recent blog on SECRET OF THE INCAS here https://livius1.wordpress.com/category/ ... on-heston/ and also some pretty good stuff on other Heston movies:

WILL PENNY
THE OMEGA MAN
THE BIG COUNTRY
TOMBSTONE
THE LAST HARD MEN

The site is well worth a look, anyway. Here is the piece on SECRET OF THE INCAS (Hey, this is my 399th post on this SECRET OF THE INCAS forum!)

Certain movies just seem to stick in the mind for one reason or another, sometimes not the whole film but a scene or two or maybe even only part of a scene. That was the case with Secret of the Incas (1954), which I recall seeing on television as a kid. It was the climax, or parts of it anyway, that remained with me and I hoped for a long time to get the chance to catch it again. Over time I’d heard it said that the film had a big influence on the development of the Indiana Jones character, and it’s easy enough to see where that idea comes from, but that didn’t interest me so much – my early viewing had preceded Raiders of the Lost Ark by a few years. Returning to half-remembered movies can, of course, prove to be enormously disappointing – all the elements which appeared thrilling and memorable to a youngster can fall completely flat when viewed through adult eyes – but not always. I’ve been able to see Secret of the Incas a few times now and I think it still holds up as an entertaining adventure yarn.

Harry Steele (Charlton Heston) is a classic pulp creation, scratching out a living in and around the Peruvian city of Cuzco. Trading on his looks and rugged demeanor, he latches onto newly arrived American tourists and offers his services as guide and, it’s strongly hinted, as a source of entertainment for the bored wives of the tired middle-aged businessmen who retain his services. Essentially, he’s a disreputable character, willing to do most anything to turn a buck and ever on the lookout for an opportunity to hit it big. In this case hitting it big would be the recovery of a fabled Inca artifact, a fabulous jewel-encrusted sunburst which has been lost for centuries and is of huge spiritual value to the indigenous people. While Steele runs his own schemes and scams he also makes use of, and is used in turn, by a fellow expatriate scoundrel, Ed Morgan (Thomas Mitchell). Both men long to get their hands on the Inca treasure, Steele actually having come into possession of a vital clue to its whereabouts, and the chance to do so presents itself in a somewhat roundabout fashion. The arrival in Cuzco of a Romanian defector, Elena Antonescu (Nicole Maurey), desperate to reach the US by any means looks at first to be an unwelcome distraction. However, the fact that the lady in question is being pursued by an official who just happens to have his own light airplane rouses Steele’s interest. He now has a way to get in and out of the lost city of Machu Picchu, where he believes the sunburst is hidden. Still, with Morgan on his trail, a team of archeologists excavating the site, and an ever-increasing stream of native pilgrims arriving daily, things may not be quite so simple.



Director Jerry Hopper had a pretty solid run of pictures in the early and mid-50s, he’d already worked with Heston on Pony Express and went on make the entertaining Smoke Signal with Dana Andrews afterwards. One of the most attractive aspects of the film is the beautiful location work in Peru, with Lionel Lindon’s camera lapping up the local color and spectacle. Hopper keeps things moving along nicely, blending footage of Peruvian customs to add a sheen of authenticity without allowing the narrative to flag. The script comes courtesy of Sydney Boehm and Ranald MacDougall, the former having written some fine films noir and there’s a brusque, hard-boiled quality to much of the dialogue that wouldn’t sound out of place in a crime film. Although this is a fairly unpretentious adventure, there’s also enough character development to ensure it doesn’t become overly formulaic. Steele grows and changes as events proceed and he undergoes the kind of redemptive arc I always appreciate seeing.

Charlton Heston almost inevitably ended up dominating any movie he appeared in, the sheer physical presence of the man demanding your attention. That trademark swagger is on display of course, but he has plenty of opportunities to show off his acting chops too. The early scenes highlight his complacent amorality, cuckolding clients to their faces and pocketing the money women give him with relish. If that were all it consisted of, it would be a one-dimensional performance though. What adds interest is the gradual awakening of some ethical sense, the realization that his current path will surely lead to his transformation into all he holds in contempt. Perhaps it’s the stinging rebuke of a woman or maybe the contact with those whose spirituality overrides base greed that pricks at his conscience; whatever the trigger actually is, the character of Steele comes to see himself as he really is, and what he may become. Heston carries that off well, but the presence of Thomas Mitchell is vital in making it work. Mitchell always gave great value as far as I’m concerned, conveying a feeling of pathos better than any character actor I’ve seen. His playing of Ed Morgan is a spot on portrayal of a man gone to seed physically and emotionally. The stubbly face, the stained sweater, the fevered and darting eyes all point to decay and decline, and it’s all perfectly believable. Nicole Maurey is fine too as the political fugitive, a woman whose shady past is alluded to but never wholly explained. This leaves her with an air of mystery and we don’t really need to know what led her to flee to South America anyway. Less satisfactory is Robert Young’s staid archeologist – his performance isn’t a bad one yet the writing leaves his character’s storyline hanging and unresolved at the end. There are supporting roles for Peruvian singer Yma Sumac (her extraordinary and haunting vocal talents provide the basis for much of the soundtrack), Michael Pate, and a knowingly humorous Glenda Farrell.



Secret of the Incas appeared to be out of circulation for a long time but there are DVDs available in both Spain and Italy now. Olive Films had announced their intention to release the movie in the US at one point and then backed out of it citing the poor condition of the available elements. I have the Spanish DVD and it’s easy to see what probably discouraged the US company. The print has the kind of overall softness and instances of damage which mean it’s crying out for restoration. Having said that, the colors are quite strong and it’s by no means a struggle to watch. While I certainly found myself thinking about how much better the film could look I can’t honestly say the presentation reduced my enjoyment to any significant degree. If hunting for lost treasure, remote and exotic locations, and old-fashioned adventure are your thing, then Secret of the Incas should satisfy.


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 Post subject: Re: Secret of the Incas
PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2015 2:12 pm 
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El Cid
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SECRET OF THE INCAS is on again twice next week, on Thursday and Friday, on British TCM.

Oddly enough, it hasn't shown up on the American TCM for decades.


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