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 Post subject: Remembering Charlton Heston
PostPosted: Sun Apr 03, 2011 10:02 pm 
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Michelangelo

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Remembering Charlton Heston

Fraser Heston on his dad's greatest films, including 'Ten Commandments' and 'Ben-Hur', and his father's commitment to family and faith.

Mark Moring | posted 3/31/2011 06:28AM :thumbsup:

http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/movies/interviews/2011/rememberingheston.html?start=1
In the famous chariot Fraser Heston with his dad and race choreographer Yakimah Canutt
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Quote:
As two of the late great Charlton Heston's biggest projects—The Ten Commandments and Charlton Heston Presents the Bible—re-release to Blu-ray and DVD this week, we caught up with his son, 56-year-old Fraser Heston, to talk about his dad's life and legacy.
....
The elder Heston died in 2008, at the age of 84 after 65 years of marriage to Lydia Clarke, who was at his side at his death. Fraser remembered his dad not only as a great actor, but a wonderful father and man of faith who loved his family.
.....
Your dad had Alzheimer's in his final years. I bet it was incredibly difficult, seeing such a strong, articulate man fading like that.
Well, I made a promise to myself not to talk about that too much. But I do want to say on behalf of people who suffer from this disease, you have to look into your soul and your faith and say, "How am I going to cope with this?" It's terribly trying. It's terribly difficult for families. My dad was remarkably courageous; he made a public statement on film or videotape [referenced in his final TV interview, with Peter Jennings]. As soon as it was diagnosed, he came out and made a public statement; it was on all the networks. He knew that he could try to help other people who suffered from that disease, and try to raise awareness. It needs a lot of funding, a lot of research. I think they're making remarkable strides in medication and treatment, early diagnosis, which is terribly important. I think those things gave him several more years of useful, conscious life than we expected, to be honest. It's not necessarily something you want to draw out. But as long as you have a reasonable quality of life and can communicate, then life is worth living.



Attention: For Heston fans in the United State especially those who live near Nastings, Nebraska.

http://www.mlive.com/entertainment/grand-rapids/index.ssf/2011/04/charlton_heston_classics_to_sh.html

Quote:
Charlton Heston classics to show in Hastings
Published: Saturday, April 02, 2011, 10:00 AM
By John Serba | The Grand Rapids Press
HASTINGS -- The Movie Memories and Milestones series at the Hastings Public Library, 227 E. State St., Hastings, will focus on the work of Charlton Heston for the month of April.

Movies include: “Ruby Gentry,” Thursday; “The Naked Jungle,” April 14; “Lucy Gallant,” April 21; “The Big Country,” April 28. All films start at 5 p.m. and will be presented by Sandra Johnson.


:cheers:


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 Post subject: Re: Remembering Charlton Heston
PostPosted: Tue Apr 05, 2011 2:28 am 
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Damned Dirty Admin
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Another nice interview with Fraser. He should do more of these, or be asked more often to do an interview. It's always an interesting read from someone who knew Chuck better than most people did.

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 Post subject: Re: Remembering Charlton Heston
PostPosted: Tue Apr 19, 2011 11:23 pm 
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Michelangelo

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A new interview with Fraser Heston about the new restored verison of the Ten Commandments, the production of "Charlton Heston Presents Bible" and the re-releasing news other films (such as "Treasure Island" that will be re-released later this year! :applause: )

The Ten Commandments: A Classic Returns Just in Time for Holy Week
By Randy Sly
4/19/2011
http://www.catholic.org/ae/movies/review.php?id=41093

Quote:
Fraser Heston, producer, director and son of the legendary actor, Charlton Heston, talks about the newly restored version of "The Ten Commandments" as well as a re-released of "Charlton Heston Presents The Bible."
,......
RWS: With all the things that your dad has done over the years, why these two?

Fraser: We are actually re-releasing on DVD several of our films. Warner's is re-releasing "Treasure Island" as well as "Antony & Cleopatra" and "MotherLoad," which are our films, later this year. I think Paramount's got a couple other things to do. :thumbsup:
.....


:wave: :cheers:


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 Post subject: Re: Remembering Charlton Heston
PostPosted: Wed Apr 20, 2011 10:50 am 
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Wow, he really makes a lot of these interviews these days, good for him and I hope it improves sales significantly.

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 Post subject: Re: Remembering Charlton Heston
PostPosted: Thu Apr 21, 2011 10:16 pm 
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Michelangelo

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Indeed :!: :sherlock:


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 Post subject: Re: Remembering Charlton Heston
PostPosted: Sun Sep 04, 2011 11:46 pm 
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Prince Judah
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Just after Charlton Heston passed away, local film critic Mick LaSalle wrote a tribute; this was published in the San Francisco Chronicle newspaper. This is all surprising in that the area is the center of severe left wing liberalism, with most of its proponents behaving as foes of Heston and all he stands for. There is a mention of that famous "cold dead hands" statement he made in this article, for example, but surrounding this mention is a detailed critique of his acting career which concludes (seems to me) that Heston has been seriously undervalued by many - this places career at the forefront, far above any petty politicking. But, it also addresses Heston the man - what the real Heston was all about - according to this writer; a lot of this really rang true to me. This is not written as a piece worshiping Heston, for his big fans, but as an honest appraisal from the other side and perhaps a way for people to re-evaluate their view of Heston. I impulsively copied and saved the piece from an internet version and it's been sitting in my computer ever since (from April, 2008). This is it:

REMEMBERING CHARLTON HESTON, MR. CONFIDENCE

Mick LaSalle - San Francisco Chronicle - April 8, 2008

Most celebrities are confident because they're successful. They've achieved a certain level of acclaim and, understandably, they feel pretty good about themselves. But Charlton Heston, who died Saturday, wasn't like that. His confidence was innate. He would have been an equally confident doctor, salesman, lawyer or laborer. He was always going to be the guy that people looked up to and asked, "What do you think, Chuck?"

Heston's sense of self was the secret of his early and lifelong success. It's what made him a good actor and, occasionally (and never timidly), a bad actor. It was what gave him the courage to take political stands, both considered and ill-considered, and what made him an easy person to be around. He could afford to be a nice man because he didn't need to prove anything, especially to himself.

My Heston story, which I've repeated many times, is that I kept him waiting for an interview 13 years ago. I left too late and took the highway when I should have taken streets, and stranded him right outside The Chronicle's third-floor elevator. You could not hide Charlton Heston. The man was 6 feet 3 and as recognizable as George Washington, which means that everybody getting off the elevator that morning did a double take.

But when I finally showed up, he was fine about it. Not only were there no remarks or cold looks, but he didn't do the usual celebrity thing of being nice by showing you, "Here I am being nice." Heston could be gracious and move on, because he had absolutely no ego investment in anybody else's courtesy. He didn't care if other people were respecting him, because he respected himself.

He had the same confidence as a struggling actor, auditioning in New York. He liked auditioning, he told me, because he considered it an opportunity to show his stuff. By contrast, he recalled casting actors for a recent play and spoke of one actor, in particular, who trembled through his audition monologue. "If it's that painful, why bother?" Heston said. He marveled at insecurity the way most of us marvel at self-assurance.

These personal qualities, combined with marvelous physical gifts - his size, his bass voice and those sculpted features that suggested maturity even in youth - made Heston the real thing. He could play conviction like no one else because it represented no stretch for him. He did not feel out of place playing classic heroes, because he looked like one and felt like one inside. Sure, he could play self-doubt, so long as it was elaborate, beautiful self-doubt. And sure, he could play indecision, so long as it was noble, spiritually courageous indecision. By size, disposition and worldview, Heston was incapable of playing a small man.

This limited him as an actor, and in an age of cynicism and irony, it's possible that some might look upon Heston's work as a joke. This is an ignorant point of view, in that it ignores the fact that while Heston couldn't play the kinds of complex roles that, say, Pacino, De Niro, Hackman and Hoffman played, nobody, but nobody, else could play the kinds of roles Heston played.

Heston's purity of essence was his strength. He was this kind of actor: You stand him up, put a camera on him, and he meant something. He meant heroism - not anti-heroism, and not even American-style heroism, like, say, John Wayne. Rather Heston represented some mythic conception of heroism, of struggling, teeth-gritting, muscle-popping humanity going into head-to-head combat with ignorance and oppression. He was classical, archetypal. Plop him down in any century over the past 2,500 years, and he'd have made it as an actor.

Remembering him as older man, or picturing him with a white beard parting the Red Sea, it's easy to forget that for years Heston was virtually a cult-of-the-body star, a thinking man (or thinking woman's) Victor Mature or Sylvester Stallone. So much of his early work was about his body. His physical beauty was a metaphor for the beauty of the cause (usually human progress in one form or another). His agonies were humankind's agonies, made physical. If someone had to represent the plight of thinking, struggling civilization, suddenly caught half naked in a cage, who better than Charlton Heston in "Planet of the Apes?"

His work was occasionally unintentionally funny. For my money, once Heston puts on the white beard in "The Ten Commandments," you may as well start playing drinking games, because the rest is just for laughs. Yet instead of blaming Heston for this, it's best to turn the question around: Could anyone else have gotten away with the things he got away with?

In fact, the real thing to marvel at is how much, thanks to Heston wasn't funny - stuff that should have been, and would have been, with any other actor. The purity of his heroic essence allowed for moments of intensity that, with anyone else, would have seemed absurd - or would have required scaling down. Are Pacino, De Niro, Hackman and Hoffman better actors than Heston? Fine. Then put them on the beach at the end of "Planet of the Apes," or show them riding away at the end of "El Cid," or working as a galley slave in "Ben-Hur."

Could they do it? Of course, they'd figure out a way, but it would be a small, ironic or personal way. Al Pacino, for example, railing on the beach at the end of "Planet of the Apes," would simply register as Al Pacino very upset. It would most certainly not register as humanity encountering the tragic folly of its ways, but that's exactly what you get from Heston.

That's a key distinction. Grasp that, and you grasp Heston's unique essence. Grasp that, and you understand why he deserved his Academy Award for "Ben-Hur," and you apprehend the nature of his lasting contribution to cinema.

Fifty years from now, somebody might still remember the old man with the toupee growling nonsense about his "cold dead hands," and maybe somebody will remember that Heston was at the big civil rights march in 1963. But if some time between now and 2058, another actor comes along that means as much as Heston meant just standing there, well, that would be surprising.

Charlton Heston's heroes for the ages
Here is a list of some of his most significant performances:
-- "The Ten Commandments" (1956): Heston as Moses.
-- "Touch of Evil" (1958): One of his best and most normal roles, as a Mexican detective.
-- "Ben-Hur" (1959): His signature role.
-- "El Cid" (1961): As a Spanish knight who rides from the gates of history into legend
-- "Khartoum" (1966): As an English general in the Sudan.
-- "Planet of the Apes" (1968): As the last civilized human being on earth.
-- "The Omega Man" (1971): As the only survivor of a future war.
-- "Soylent Green" (1973): In another nightmare scenario, as the one man who knows the truth.
-- "Earthquake" (1974): Lots of fun, in one of the blockbuster's earliest rumblings.
-- "Hamlet" (1996): As the player king, in the Kenneth Branagh film


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 Post subject: Re: Remembering Charlton Heston
PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2011 2:37 pm 
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Prince Judah
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Hail, your lordship! Wonderful stuff, just like you. Who else but Chrysagon the knight could have put it?

I have Robert. D. Morningster's tribute to Chuck(published in the internet on the Passover of 2008), which I am going to post :

Personal Memories of Charlton Heston

I shall always remember Charlton Heston as the model of a great American, a man of strongly held principles, great eloquence, grace, charm, noble purpose and inner strength.
I am grateful to have known him and that, during his final years, I had the privilege to call him "a friend." I have met many stars throughout my life but never have I been more impressed (or "star struck") than the day that I shook hands with Moses and El Cid. I remember with great pleasure and some mischievous glee, the surprised look that came across his face as he autographed his book for me, when I said to him:

"Mr. Heston. You have been for me, throughout my life, a guide, a lodestone and a compass, in my spiritual quest… May I have your permission to communicate with you about Druids and Democracy?"

Mr. Heston, quite surprised by my request and the topic (to be sure), with eyebrows raised, looked at me with sapphire-blue eyes and smiled broadly, replying:

"Well, Yes! Of course, you may!"


We shook hands and I was quite "electrified" to realize that for over 50 years, I had already known this man. He had become a part of me, a major facet of my belief system, in my soul, a symbol of my faith and spiritual values and a clear definition of "manhood."

As I looked upon him, then almost as old as Moses had been in the final scenes of "The Ten Commandments," I realized how fortunate I was to have seen him eye-to-eye and shaken hands with "Moses," "Judah Ben Hur," and "El Cid" in the flesh.
That meeting began a 10-year long correspondence with yearly birthday and holiday wishes exchanged, as well as books and letters.

My last communication with him came near the end of his years with my final birthday greeting to him and a poem that I had written for him to commemorate his 81st birthday.

I knew that his time here was not long and I was deeply touched (as he was suffering then from advanced Alzheimer's Disease) to receive his reply through his devoted secretary and personal assistant, Ms. Carol M. Lanning, who wrote in his stead:

October 13, 2005
Dear Mr. Morningstar:

Mr. Heston has asked me to thank you for your warm birthday greetings and generous words: they touched him deeply. The poem you did brought tears to the eyes of all of us who heard it read.

Thank you not only from Mr. Heston but from all of us. He accepts your prayers with deep humility and gratitude. You'll be interested to know that Mr. Heston is living quietly in his home surrounded by his family and friends. He has a team of medical people who genuinely care for his comfort and well-being.

May God continue to hold us under the shadow of His wings.

With regards,



Carol M. Lanning
Personal Assistant to
Charlton Heston

The poem that I composed for his birthday 2005, inspired by Walt Whitman's "Captain, My Captain," was entitled "A Poem for Captain Heston, October 4th, 2005… In celebration of his 81st Revolution of the Star, Sol."

Charlton Heston's Final Message to his Friends & Fans


I recall very clearly that late summer day in August 2002 that it was reported on CNN that Charlton Heston would be announcing his retirement from the public arena.

It saddened me deeply but as I watched his statement, he surprised me once again.
I marveled at his courage, his composure, his strength of character and the deep affection that he expressed for his family, his friends and his millions of fans.

Shortly thereafter, I received a letter, containing a separate envelope inside, marked "Personal." The inner envelope contained his final written message to his friends and fans.

I have attempted in this memoriam to demonstrate that Charlton Heston played a unique role in late 20th Century history by moving millions to believe in the ultimate triumph of good over evil, of hope over despair, and the ultimate victory of love over hatred.

In his memory, I share his final message with you for it reveals, more than any other of the letters that I received during the past 10 years, the true measure of the greatness of this gifted human being, a man historic importance, at once demonstrating his courage, his kindness, gentility and his stature as a true American patriot, cast in the mold of "the originals," like Washington, Jefferson, and Madison, whom he affectionately used to call "Those old white-haired guys."


I shall always remember Charlton Heston as an archetype, "A Light in Time," which was projected upon mankind at a critical moment in history when humanity and the world most needed hope for the future, invested in a hero, the embodiment of a prophet and the incarnation of El Cid.

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 Post subject: Re: Remembering Charlton Heston
PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2011 3:36 pm 
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Thanks a lot for those articles, guys. I enjoyed reading them very much. I believe the article that Chrysagon posted was also posted in the thread on IMDb where people who had met Chuck talked about their encounters. Either that or the person who wrote the article wrote something similar on IMDb.

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 Post subject: Re: Remembering Charlton Heston
PostPosted: Tue Sep 06, 2011 4:15 pm 
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Prince Judah
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God! why should you thank me? Rather I should be happy that I've been able to post something which is at least pleasing to you(and others, I may hope). Here's another thing which you may like to read:"GOD'S OWN VOICE"

By: James A. Brandes

Written 6th of April 2008



In Memory Of "Charlton 'CHUCK' Heston"

(Born: John Charles Carter)

4th of October 1923 – 5th of April 2008





"We are such stuff as dreams are made of"





Because we were created by the GREATEST DREAMER of ALL
For only GOD could create a DREAM
Wherein not a single person is considered small

Yesterday, we lost the man who often quoted this line
Charlton "CHUCK" Heston
A Very Dear Friend of Mine

As a writer I can tell you, "It's TRUE"
NEVER can anyone scribe a collection of words
That could even begin to relay how we feel; knowing what from "CHUCK" we've heard

He defended TRUTH and WORTHY CAUSES; way before it was the popular thing to do
A "True Renaissance Man"; of awesome valor
Who to his own self; forever remained TRUE

A man; although caught in the main stream of Hollywood
To his wife Lydia and children, remained always there
LOVINGLY at their side, proving how much he cared

HEAVEN awaits him with out stretched arms
With a trumpeted fanfare
Beyond even that of a "Chariot Race's Charms"

I thrill to know, CHUCK will now find
Answers to the many questions
He has left behind

This "Giant Intellect" who willingly shared with us all
What I'm positive was to him
GOD'S GREAT CALL

As last night; I'm sure he heard the best words of all
"COME HOME MY SON"
As he responded to GOD'S final CALL

OH Yes; we as humans we'll grieve beyond words
Until our turn comes
These wonderful words to have heard

I know my friends
It will soon be

GOD will utter these words to me

But, the fact remains awesomely true

Time could run out
For any of you

I would just PRAY
Each of you find
You lived as did, Charlton Heston; knowing real peace of mind

Like Paul, in Scripture
You've properly run life's race
And can claim your reward through "GOD'S DIVINE GRACE"

So as SCRIPTURE admonishes
Let us cry at a birth; but now at this death "REJOICE"
As we hear GOD'S WORDS to Chuck, "WELL DONE"

IN

"GOD'S OWN VOICE"

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 Post subject: Re: Remembering Charlton Heston
PostPosted: Tue Sep 06, 2011 4:42 pm 
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Prince Judah
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I posted here the Eulogy read by Chuck's son, after his passing away. But I have recently started a new topic 'Chuck as a Family man'. Thinking that this Eulogy will be better-suited there, I have removed it to that thread.

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Last edited by itsjudah24 on Tue Jan 03, 2012 4:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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