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 Post subject: Re: Remembering Charlton Heston
PostPosted: Sun May 05, 2013 4:07 pm 
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Prince Judah
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The National Portrait Gallary remembers Chuck as a great contributor and patron, and here are some fond memories they share:

"His work for the Screen Actors Guild and the National Rifle Association occupied much of Heston’s time from the mid-1960s until his retirement from public life in 2002, after being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. Heston served as president of SAG from 1965 to 1971 and as president of the NRA from 1998 to 2003. He was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2003 and, much earlier in his career, marched on Washington in 1963 with Martin Luther King Jr.

Charlton Heston’s work extended to the very doors of the National Portrait Gallery. He volunteered his services as the narrator for Faces of Freedom, a half-hour film tracing the history of the United States through portraits in NPG’s collection. It premiered in July 1977 and was shown daily to orient visitors, and to introduce other audiences to what this comparatively new museum was all about. In appreciation for his magnificent delivery (he was chosen as narrator with Moses in mind), Heston was awarded the silver gilt Copley Medal, an honor bestowed on those who have made significant contributions to NPG. At a gala evening presentation in 1980, Heston stood in the Great Hall to hear Secretary Dillon Ripley proclaim “a handsome medal for a handsome man.”

Many NPG staffers have fond memories of the 1980 gala. Linda Thrift of CEROS also remembers Heston as a handsome man, adding, “He was gracious and he had that smile on his face.” Beverly Cox, director of exhibitions and collections management, says of Heston, “I remember being overwhelmed by his sense of presence and was pleased to see how kind he was to the staff.” Amy Henderson, an NPG historian, states, “I was there, and must say he looked like a movie star. When I said something like, ‘Hi, Mr. Heston,’ he replied, ‘Chuck.’”

If you want to read the full page, click here: http://face2face.si.edu/my_weblog/2008/04/

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 Post subject: Re: Remembering Charlton Heston
PostPosted: Fri May 31, 2013 3:54 am 
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Whether He's Talking Movies or Politics, Charlton Heston Is a Straight Shooter

By William Booth
Washington Post Staff Writer
Sunday, December 7 1997; Page G05


In the beginning, there was the jaw, and the jaw was tight. It was a chiseled jaw in the marble landscape of a face, and the mouth was not the kind for kissing, but for barking commandments in the clearest possible diction, each word given its own space and time, and woe be unto those unbelievers who would worship the golden calf when he came down from the mountain and laid down the law of the land.

Because Moses was not a man -- or Charlton Heston an actor -- to mumble his lines. Or to monkey with.

In the mind's eye, the iconic roles of Heston's career were figures of absolute authority: Ben-Hur and El Cid, Charles Gordon of Khartoum, Moses and Capt. Taylor marooned on a planet populated by talking apes. Bigger-than-life men, men of intestinal fortitude, tested by the fates, standing ramrod-straight, leading with their jaw, entering the arena to do battle, no quarter asked or given.

Also, Heston became famous -- or infamous -- for his politics, particularly his role in later years as the front man for the National Rifle Association and his belief that the Bill of Rights is built upon the bedrock of the Second Amendment. You would take away Chuck Heston's right to bear arms at your own peril.

And so these may be reasonable images to pass through the mind as one ascends Coldwater Canyon to visit Heston at his hilltop lair, which he calls, simply, the Ridge. He holds the high ground.

One is aware that in his 1995 autobiography, "In the Arena," Heston offered his thoughts on the importance of well-defended perimeter.

"Most people in the film community are unfamiliar with firearms and many oppose them, some quite virulently," Heston wrote. "During the L.A. riots in 1992, a good many of these folk suffered a change of heart. As smoke from burning buildings smudged the skyline and the TV news showed vivid images of laughing looters smashing windows and carting off boomboxes and booze, I got a few phone calls from firmly anti-gun friends in clear conflict. 'Umm, Chuck, you have quite a few . . . ah, guns, don't you?'

" 'Yes, I do.'

" 'Shotguns and . . . like that?'

" 'Indeed.'

" 'Could you lend me one for a day or so? I tried to buy one, but they have this waiting period . . . ' "

This waiting period, indeed.

Heston concludes the lesson with the warning to looters eyeing his boomboxes and booze. "Our only neighbors on our ridge are the Isaacs. Between us, Billy and I must own at least 40 firearms of various types. We would resist with deadly force any assault on our homes or those who live in them."

Because Charlton Heston holds the high ground.

And so on a warm, sunny morning, as the visitor pulls into the drive, a figure appears behind the window and watches. It is Heston himself. He steps out, extends a handshake of medium-strength grip and leads the way inside. The jaw is still there and the eyes are bright and clear. For Heston is now 74 years old and has recently had hip surgery, the bane of the aged, and so moves stiffly into the living room, wearing nylon sweat pants that make a shushing sound, and on his feet are thick white socks and a pair of cheap black Chinese slippers, and he is shuffling. Time passes for all, and Chuck Heston's days of chariot racing are behind him.

"I have played formidable authority figures," he begins, his voice still bass, still resonating with an oaken-cask profundo. "Characters not easy to get along with. Kings and warriors and cowboys and cops and astronauts, and, of course, Moses. None of these men you want to cross."

Indeed. A few years ago, Heston returned to the screen in a cameo role for director James Cameron in Arnold Schwarzenegger's "True Lies," in which Heston played, complete with a pirate's eye patch, the director of the Central Intelligence Agency. He explains: "Cameron said that I was the only actor who could plausibly intimidate Arnold." He knows that he has that power, and the trademark of grit appears to please him. It has clearly provided him with his life's work.

"It is my physical equipment," he says. "I was once asked why there weren't as many tall actors today and I have to say that stumped me. There aren't."

Heston had the height and jawbone, and the voice that is almost as recognizable as a signature. Throughout his career, Heston has done Shakespeare "because that is what I believe actors should do." It shows in his acting.

While other actors, in his time and later, pursued a more naturalistic style of acting, Heston's work is classical and theatrical -- and physical. He says it is a matter of pride that he learned to fight with broadswords, and ride horses and camels, and to race a chariot, as he did in "Ben-Hur," probably his most memorable role next to Moses.

Modern audiences today who rent his long-running videos on rainy weekends might find his acting in the epics a bit stiff and dated, but oddly comforting. In a contemporary culture, riven by crosscurrents fuzzing the lines of good and evil, Charlton Heston is the crossing guard.

In interviews and his autobiography, Heston is generous about the work of others and humble about his own. "I have done some great scenes," he says. "I have had some great parts. There was some good work and some not-so-good work, there were failed films and a few fine ones. As for my work, I will leave that to others."

He is, though, unhappy about certain trends in modern cinema and American life. "There are fewer giant figures today," he says. "The excitement in the movies is largely digital. There is nothing much really to act. The actors could be replaced by holograms, could become special effects themselves."

As Heston reclines on a couch in his living room, his fingers fidget with his shirt buttons and tug at the upholstery piping, distracted.

"I am not Moses," he says at one point. But how to reconcile the man and the actor?

Most of his early boyhood, until the age of 10, was spent in the Michigan woods. In his autobiography, Heston writes of hunting and helping put meat in the stew pot. But he admits it was only a few rabbits, at most, and that he spent more time in the forest around his home, pretending to be other people, Huck Finn or Davy Crockett.

His parents were divorced when he was young -- a traumatic event, and a shame to him that he never spoke of at the time. He and his mother moved about until she remarried and the family moved to Wilmette, a Chicago North Shore suburb. In high school, he was not skilled enough to play team sports, so he joined the rifle team and the chess club, but dropped them when he discovered a love of the stage.

It was Drama Club for young Chuck. He was a shy boy and he says the shyness has been with him for a lifetime. He was never adopted by his mother's second husband, Chet Heston, but he took his name. "It is possible," he writes, "that I'm a loner because I'm an actor. An actor at work is giving you somebody else. He's not performing to you; you're watching him be another man. In my case, it's often a real historical figure, a far better man than I am myself."

The Winnetka Community Theater awarded him a scholarship to Northwestern University to study acting, but his training was interrupted by World War II. He joined the Navy. He served his time in a lonely outpost in the Aleutian Islands. He did not fire a shot in anger. As he put it: "I attended World War II."

He married his wife, Lydia, also an actor, and their marriage continues more than 50 years later.

Heston's political activities began with leadership of a union, the Screen Actors Guild. He voted Democratic, for Kennedy and Johnson, and, as many of the current critics of his politics may not recall, he was an early supporter of civil rights and marched in Washington, in the full flower of his celebrity after his roles as Moses and Ben-Hur, with Martin Luther King Jr.

But Heston was, even then, turning to the right. He recalls, while filming "War Lord," being driven from location to hotel and passing a large billboard with a portrait of Barry Goldwater and a sea of blue and the words: "In your heart, you know he's right."

"Yeah," Heston says now, talking on the Ridge. "that was Saint Paul on the road to Damascus." An epiphany. The turning of the screw.

"Dear God, what a sorry road we've slid down since then," Heston believes. The slide? In his book, the actor-activist rails.

...

And overpopulation of the planet, an issue that forms the central idea of his one "message movie," the 1973 chiller with one of his most memorable lines: "Soylent Green . . . is people."

"Our borders are awash in immigrants," he writes, "a large proportion of them illegal, but all nonetheless qualified for the fruits of our welfare state, entitled to generous benefits, including not only voting in our elections on ballots in the language of their choice, but the education of their progeny in that language."

On another page, he relates, "A columnist described the childhood of a welfare kid with brutal honesty: first felony arrest at fourteen, becomes an absent parent at sixteen, out of school at seventeen if he gets that far, with a diploma he can't read."

A society unraveling? A planet of the apes? The man who played Moses is honestly, deeply concerned. "In a staggering number of Hollywood films of the past 20 years, the villains are authority figures in American society," he says.

Charlton Heston, for his 20 years in the arena, was the authority figure in American epic films. There was right and wrong. Good and evil. Honor and cowardice. Heston died for something in his movies. Moses did not reach the promised land. El Cid died of his wounds, but was propped upon his stallion's back, dead, to lead his men into glorious battle against the invading Moors in Spain.

The world is now more of a muddle.

After an hour or so, it is time to leave the Ridge. The road to his house is being rebuilt, and the workers and their equipment are crowding the front drive, but Heston comes out and waves his arm, directing traffic, bringing order, parting the waves, and then he limps back into the house and, in the rearview mirror, closes the door.

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 Post subject: Re: Remembering Charlton Heston
PostPosted: Wed Jun 05, 2013 10:40 pm 
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No Water For Me

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How was my friend treated so nicely by Chuck Heston on the set of the Mountain Men? He's a super dude and per friend Mike, you would never have known he was such a big star. My friend Mike was kinda turned on well alot by Fraser's 1st wife and he was taking picture after picture of her. He was and still is a member of the Primitive Riflemen Association and they are the ones who bought him-CH- a like 3k classic custom made 18th century flint lock rifle that I have a picture of him shooting. They were the ones at the party scene. Well Chuck caught on when Fray did not. He, the great CH, told my friend Mike, dude I'd stay away from her as my son can "kick my ***" in other words, I see that you dig her but her hubby does not. Stay away from her or there will be problems but he did it so he made himself look inferior. Now at that point, Fray was not the size he is now in 1980 and I doubt that anybody could or would kick his *** but he gave him his autograph and told him to just get drunk, any woman will look good to you then. With humor, taste and class to avoid a possible sexual confrontation. Poor Mike and I broke up, he married a wealthy woman and is miserable but still has the pictures and the memories. There was only one in all of Hollywood who did not think of himself as a God-wow so much needed now. I will always love this man and he is always in my heart and my fiance loves him also. Good luck to all of us, but the great one is looking down at us with a smile now.


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 Post subject: Re: Remembering Charlton Heston
PostPosted: Thu Jun 13, 2013 2:57 am 
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Amusing incident, and it shows how he could tackle a situation with advice with a naughty sense of humour.

Here is a nice appreciation of Heston's career, remembering a number of his major roles from http://whiskyprajer.blogspot.in/2004_02_01_archive.html.

"Charlton Heston, Patrician Punchline"

In the early spring of 1993, I took a Greyhound bus from Toronto to Winnipeg, a trip I'd made several times before. Typically, a traveller could expect to finish a novel or two, converse with various fellow travellers, and still spend hours contemplating the spare Canadian Shield landscape. This time around, I was given a third distraction: television. Or, more precisely, a monitor that played a series of straight-to-video productions.

I chose not to spend the four dollars for the ear-phones, but when the screen started to roll the opening credits for A Man For All Seasons, starring Charlton Heston, my seat-mate generously offered me his phones, and I jumped at the chance. I watched, mouth agape, while Heston towered over his would-be persecutors, scowling imperiously as they plotted to hedge the hapless Thomas More toward execution, Henry-The-VIII-style. All traces of Paul Scofield's landmark performance were cleared from memory. Where Scofield's More was diminutive, Heston's was now domineering; inner torment was replaced with moral certitude, ironic whimsy with a contemptuous sneer. When Heston's More was finally railroaded toward the executioner's block, it came as a relief not just to the conspirators, but to the audience as well. This cat was no "man for all seasons"; he was a hectoring killjoy, whose season had lasted all too long.

This scene came to mind as I recently re-watched Soylent Green. SG is typical of its genre — a mostly tedious distopia, projected from the Toffler template of the 70s. The more costly attempts to look futuristic are predictably amusing (one character plays a video game that looks one step below "Pong"), while the stuff done on the cheap rings discomfortingly true (people sleeping en masse in stairwells, sweaty characters complaining about "the greenhouse effect," etc). The pleasant surprise was rediscovering what had become for Heston a stock-in-trade performance.

SG's Detective Robert Thorn is a cookie-cutter role that could be interchanged with any number of 70s Heston performances, from Astronaut George Taylor to Robert Neville, "The Omega Man." Thorn is essentially a lout and a bully, who swaggers from scene to scene projecting an air of malign impatience. He uses force and extortion to get what he wants, but occasionally his façade lapses to reveal a man with a sentimental soft-spot. Clearly the guy needs to Learn A Lesson. And because the set-up requires two hours of your movie-watching time, you know in advance that The Lesson is going to be a doozy.

One decade later, both Soylent Green and Charlton Heston were punchline fodder. DEVO referred to SG nearly as often as it referred to genetic manipulation and pornographic grotesquery, and Saturday Night Live pulled countless yucks from an agreeable Heston — one of Phil Hartman's better gags was a command performance of Heston's Greatest Hits: "Soylent Green ... IS PEOPLE!! AAAAARRGH!!" Planet Of The Apes — "You sonsabitches ... YOU BLEW IT ALL UP!! AAAAARRGH!!" etc.

The best punchlines, of course, sneak up on you. Planet of the Apes works because the disconnect — apes rule humans - is so total it distracts you from the punchline right to the bitter end. Rod Serling was a master at that sort of thing, while SG's Harry Harrison was one of those lamentable joke-tellers whose premature chortling at his own cleverness pulls the snap from the payoff.

Heston clearly tired of the joke, though, and took an ill-advised turn from those lout-with-a-heart-of-gold roles to become the strident and thoughtless spokesman for the NRA — Thomas More, with a loaded AK-47; lout sans heart. What an astonishment it was, then, to be moved to tears by his performance as The Player King in Kenneth Branagh's epic production of Hamlet. Who'd have thought the lout was capable projecting not just an imperial mien, but a majestic depth of emotion as well? Geez — now you actually wanted to see him try his hand at King Lear!

His physicality — his patrician bearing - was Heston's great trademark, of course. It was, as only he could intone with such gravitas, "My blessing — and my curse." It worked in his favor when his directors (and I include Michael Moore) set it off-kilter. But Hollywood seems to have lost this horseshoe-in-a-kid-glove touch. Ben Affleck, for instance, could become the new Heston, but the current zeitgeist's narrative componentry is all wrong: movies start with the hero as a gentle soul driven to violent deeds, never considering the rich possibilities of reversing the order. Sad, really, when what we need now, more than ever, is a return of The Lout Who Learns A Lesson.

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 Post subject: Re: Remembering Charlton Heston
PostPosted: Tue Jun 18, 2013 11:09 pm 
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Michelangelo

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Northwestern University Memorial Site: Notable Deaths & Obituaries

http://www.legacy.com/memorial-sites/no ... niversity/

Heston's is one of the most viewed memorials. The link is near the bottom of the page.


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 Post subject: Re: Remembering Charlton Heston
PostPosted: Wed Jun 19, 2013 7:38 am 
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Marabunta

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CHfan2010 wrote:
Northwestern University Memorial Site: Notable Deaths & Obituaries

http://www.legacy.com/memorial-sites/no ... niversity/

Heston's is one of the most viewed memorials. The link is near the bottom of the page.



for those who do not know this website http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cg ... d=25772172


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 Post subject: Re: Remembering Charlton Heston
PostPosted: Thu Jun 20, 2013 3:46 pm 
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This one is just wonderful... I can't help quoting it full . It's by a fan , Joe Fazio.

For Charlton...

WEEP NOT FOR ME


Do not weep for me when I no longer dwell among the wonders of the earth; for my larger self is free, and my soul rejoices on the other side of pain...on the other side of darkness.

Do not weep for me, for I am a ray of sunshine that touches your skin, a tropical breeze upon your face, the hush of joy within your heart and the innocence of babes in mothers arms.

I am the hope in a darkened night. And, in your hour of need, I will be there to comfort you. I will share your tears, your joys, your fears, your disappointments and your triumphs.

Do not weep for me, for I am cradled
in the arms of God. I walk with the angels, and hear the music beyond the stars.

Do not weep for me, for I am within you;
I am peace, love, I am a soft wind that caresses the flowers. I am the calm that follows a raging storm. I am an autumns leaf that floats among the garden of God, and I am pure white snow that softly falls upon your hand.

Do not weep for me, for I shall never die, as long as you remember me...
with a smile and a sigh

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 Post subject: Re: Remembering Charlton Heston
PostPosted: Wed Jul 17, 2013 2:52 pm 
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The Charlton Heston Academy, an institution *** school in North Michigan, the place of the great man's boyhood memories, continues to honour him by bearing his name as the title for its educational enterprise. This is a real way of remembering', not only with words but with dedicatory work for a good cause. Here is the website for the academy: http://charltonhestonacademy.com/category/in-the-news/

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 Post subject: Re: Remembering Charlton Heston
PostPosted: Thu Jul 18, 2013 1:13 am 
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Very nice and fitting tribute.

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 Post subject: Re: Remembering Charlton Heston
PostPosted: Fri Jun 13, 2014 4:27 am 
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To revive the thread, another account of remembering Chuck -- www.forbes.com/.../holey-moses-my-fleet ... ton-heston

Holey Moses! My Fleeting Meeting With Charlton Heston

"Charlton Heston; The Legend:

To set the stage here, it might be appropriate to note that despite my space background, or perhaps because of it, I’m not a celebrity star-struck sort of guy. Where it comes to knowing and working with people who have earned international fame and public gratitude, I have won that lottery of fortune many times over. So it wasn’t a particularly big deal to me when I learned that movie icon Charlton Heston would be speaking at a luncheon sponsored by a Republican woman’s group about a dozen years ago and decided to attend. Although I was impressed by many of his films, the fact that he headed the NRA at that time was more important to me than his Hollywood prominence.

The well-attended event was held in a very spacious Houston hotel ballroom. Following what I recall to have been a very nice meal and a brief introduction, seemingly pretty conventional stuff, Mr. Heston walked briskly to a podium. He was in his late 70s at the time, evidencing no apparent sign of the Alzheimer’s disease which would soon torment his remaining years.

If everything seemed ordinary up to that point, those circumstances immediately took a dramatic turn when Mr. Heston’s deeply resonant voice and commanding presence filled that room. Speaking without notes, he delivered a spellbinding soliloquy in the character of Aaron, brother of Moses, prior to the deliverance of Israel out of Egypt.

Yes, although Heston is perhaps best known for portraying Moses in the epic “Ten Commandments” production, he chose on this occasion to express Aaron’s anguished words upon being ordered by God to cooperate with his long-absent brother in all ways possible to bring about the Exodus.

Aaron nearly always accompanied Moses as his highly-articulate spokesman at important events. He was with Moses when he met with the Pharaoh, stood with him on a hill overlooking the scene of battle with Amalek in Rephidam, and encamped with Moses part way up Mt. Sinai when he retrieved tablets engraved with the Ten Commandments.

But Aaron had flaws that would lead to big trouble throughout his life. While Moses remained on the mountain, Aaron went back down and hastily made a golden calf as an object of worship. He was rebuked for that, but Moses prayed and asked God not to destroy him for that sin. Having learned a lesson, Aaron later did the same for his sister Miriam, and later became a high priest.

Mr. Heston’s portrayal of Aaron’s distressed state regarding the great responsibility God placed upon him to help bring about the Exodus was moving…powerful…riveting. I remember sitting in a totally stunned state for some moments afterwards.

Attendees were then invited to have pictures taken with Heston in exchange for NRA donations. I acted upon the opportunity, happily kicking in a few bucks to support that worthwhile purpose. Okay…I’ll also admit that a photo-op with this remarkable fellow was simply too tempting for my shameless ego to resist.

It finally became my turn in line to get my “this famous person doesn’t know me from Adam but no one will know from this picture” trophy. Then, after having our images immortalized standing side by side like lifelong friends, I was startled to hear that deep, imposing voice again, this time speaking directly to me. It (he) said “WELL DONE MY SON.”

Well, of course it actually sounded much better than that. After all, I’m certainly no Charlton Heston, a fact which is also brutally apparent on the resulting photograph…he’s obviously taller. Then, after that meeting literally ended in a flash, it immediately occurred to me…Damn! If Moses had been even nearly that commanding a presence, it’s no wonder that the Red Sea divided its waters at his behest!

Chuck Heston; The Man:

There was a great deal more behind Charlton Heston’s charismatic persona than stagecraft. He was, most definitely, a much more thoughtful and socially-principled person than Jim Carrey’s irreverent parody portrayed. And as an occasional Saturday Night Live participant and host, he probably would have enjoyed that politically-incorrect satire, even at his own expense.

Charlton Heston never lost sight of his authentic identity, once observing: “I’ve played three presidents, three saints and two geniuses – and that’s probably enough for any man.” He was mindful of a patriotic responsibility in his profession, stating: “…more and more, we see films that diminish the American experience and example. And sometimes trash it completely.” He also recognized international influence of his film roles, saying, “To the world, you Are America.”

If you can possibly imagine it, his wife, Lydia, called him “Charlie”. Wouldn’t referring to Charlton Heston as Charlie be kind’a like referring to Moses “Big Mo”, to Ben-Hur as “Benny H”, or to El Cid (Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar) as “The Sidney”? But I digress.

“Chuck” Heston, as he was known to personal friends, had enlisted to serve his country in 1944, acting as a radio operator and aerial gunner aboard a B-25 stationed with the Eleventh Air Force in the Alaskan Aleutian Islands. After the war ended, he and Lydia managed a small playhouse in Ashville, North Carolina. In 1948 he landed a supporting role in a Broadway revival of Shakespeare’s Anthony and Cleopatra, starring Katherine Cornell. Later, after the film producer of Casablanca spotted him in a 1950 television version of Wuthering Heights and offered him a contract, the young couple moved to California to check out the movie business. That turned out to be a very provident move.
....

The valued picture of the two of us on my office console serves as a reminder that lessons from Charlton Heston, the actor, and Chuck Heston, the man, have much to teach us all. He recognized that while, like Aaron, we and our country possess flaws, we are also imbued with the strength and goodness to prevail over trying challenges and daunting adversities. On stage and off, his inspiring works and solid commitments to American values represented our great country well. We have much reason to be very grateful to him.

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