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 Post subject: Re: Remembering Charlton Heston
PostPosted: Thu Feb 28, 2013 2:57 pm 
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Prince Judah
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I think I have also posted this somewhere, but where exactly I don't recall. It is nice to be thought of as Chuck's sister, Barbara is so fortunate!

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 Post subject: Re: Remembering Charlton Heston
PostPosted: Fri Apr 05, 2013 7:50 pm 
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Michelangelo

Joined: Tue Nov 09, 2010 4:11 pm
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It's been FIVE years since Mr Heston's passing today... :( :cry:

I found an 'old' video clip to tribute him....

Charlton Heston 1924-2008 (Tribute Compilation)



:elcid: :neville: :soylent: :harrysteele: :sherlock: :richelieu: :ljsilver: :ddape: :cowboy1:


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 Post subject: Re: Remembering Charlton Heston
PostPosted: Fri Apr 05, 2013 9:23 pm 
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Cheating Bastard

Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2011 7:40 am
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I was just thinking how it's been 5 years. I really like obituary/tribute cartoons. Many of the ones for Mr. Heston were mean-spirited due to political differences the artists had with him, but there are a few I like.

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He is missed.


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 Post subject: Re: Remembering Charlton Heston
PostPosted: Sat Apr 06, 2013 2:30 am 
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Soylent Corp. Lackey

Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2010 9:18 pm
Posts: 87
Love the obituary/tribute cartoons, better side.
It's hard to believe it's been five years. Really miss him.
May this Charlton Heston Forum last forever, as a tribute to his memory.


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 Post subject: Re: Remembering Charlton Heston
PostPosted: Sat Apr 06, 2013 5:20 am 
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Damned Dirty Admin
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5 years since we lost this great man. It seems that for every year that passes, I admire him even more, if that's even possible.

He left us with quite a legacy.

R.I.P.

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 Post subject: Re: Remembering Charlton Heston
PostPosted: Sat Apr 06, 2013 2:33 pm 
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Love the cartoons, especially the third one. He will live forever in our memory.

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 Post subject: Re: Remembering Charlton Heston
PostPosted: Sat Apr 06, 2013 4:16 pm 
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Prince Judah
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I am so sorry for being late, yesterday I could not find time to come to the board. To pay a belated tribute to our dear Chuck's everlasting memory, here are some photos as memorial...

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 Post subject: Re: Remembering Charlton Heston
PostPosted: Sat Apr 06, 2013 6:29 pm 
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Cheating Bastard

Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2011 7:40 am
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Considering we just lost Roger Ebert, I figure I would post (or re-post as I can't remember if I have before) these from his website.

http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/19680526/PEOPLE/805260301

There was a smile of conspiracy on the face of the Irish bartender. "Now you listen carefully, and I'll tell you what to do," he whispered to his blue-eyed wife.

"I want you to walk over there to Charlton Heston, and throw your stomach out, and scream at him: 'You bloody *******, where's me payments for child support?' Now can you do that much for me?"

His wife, who was expecting a child at any instant, raised her eyes toward heaven as if to ask God's mercy on such a rascal of a husband. Then she brought her eyes back toward Earth and said, "You're daft, that's what you are. You're out of your mind." Then she smiled. "Still," she said, "it would make a darling joke, wouldn't it . . ."

Unaware of these plots being hatched against him, Charlton Heston held court in a corner of the saloon, a small establishment on North Av. "I wonder if it's true as they say," he said, "that all journalists are drunks."

He poured himself a glass of half-and-half. "I suppose not," he said. "But it's very nearly true of English actors, you know. They're all very serious drinkers, whether they care for it or not."

Heston, who had not been asked for a single autograph all evening, was relaxed and at ease, His companions at the corner table were mostly newspaper reporters, known to gather at this saloon from time to time. As Heston paused to consider the foam on his glass, still another reporter arrived.

"Allow me to introduce myself," he said. "I'm Michael McGuire, the military editor of the Tribune."

Heston shook hands and said, "Chuck Heston. Glad to meet you. The Tribune? Ah, yes, you supported my policies in the Ben-Hur campaign."

There was general laughter, and McGuire said he would draw the line at Moses. A look of pain crossed Heston's face.

"Not Moses," he said. "Please, not Moses. Since I played Moses, I've heard every Moses joke ever conceived by the mind of man."

"I've got a new one," said Fritz Plous, a free lance writer and rabbit skin salesman. "It's a joke David Steinberg did at Second City."

"Let's have it," said Heston.

"Well," said Plous, "God told Moses, take off your shoes, Moses, and approach the burning bush. And Moses did, and burnt his feet. And God said Ha! Third one today!"

Heston laughed heartily. "A new one," he said. "I wouldn't have believed it."

Plous, who was wearing a railroad's conductor's cap, took it off and bowed.

"That's a nice conductor's hat," Heston said. "We ought to present it to Leonard Bernstein."

Another pitcher of half-and-half arrived at the table, accompanied by Jim Agnew, local film buff.

"You were great as John the Baptist," Agnew said.

"A wet assignment," Heston said. "We did a wet scene in 'Will Penny,' too. It was raining, and we went right ahead shooting. It was the first time in my experience that a scene was shot in actual rain. Rain machines, yes, but never a perfectly timed shower."

"Will Penny" is Heston's new Western, in which he plays a real, authentic cowboy. "It's one of my favorite roles," he said, "because it is real, you see, and not all faked up to make it nice. It even has an unhappy ending. We shot up in the mountains in the wintertime, which is another unusual aspect. Usually you avoid shooting on location during the winter because the snow causes light problems and the shooting day is so much shorter.

"But we wanted that authenticity. The weather was just right. We got a little snow, and then a little more, and finally a blizzard. That was a switch from shooting in the desert for 'Planet of the Apes.'"

"Also when you were John the Baptist," Agnew said.

"You have a John the Baptist thing," Heston said.

"Only when I smile."

Heston tasted again of his half-and-half and smiled.

"I'm the only human being in most of 'Planet of the Apes'," he said. "Have you seen it? It's an interesting film; it succeeds at several levels, including, thank heavens, the box office."

It was also a typical Heston role, casting him as the sole standard-bearer for humanity. "I always get the super-hero parts," he said. "That's one nice thing about 'Will Penny,' I'm just an ordinary cowboy, not Ben Hur in the saddle."

A wicked smile crossed his face. "You know," he said softly, "that chariot race was fixed."

"Where did you get your chariot driving lessons?" asked McGuire, the military editor.

"A good question," said Heston. "It is a highly esoteric profession, since no Italians now alive give instructions in it. Actually, I played it by ear."

Basil Talbott Jr., a Sun-Times reporter, ventured over from the bar (where all attempts to enlist the bartender's wife in public accusation had apparently failed).

"I saw you in that 16mm version of 'Julius Caesar' shot here in Chicago," Talbott said. "How long ago was that?"

"Oh, Lord, 20 years or more, when I was at Northwestern," Heston said. "We used all actual locations. The steps of the Art Institute, the Elk's Temple, the Field Museum, the beaches of Lake Michigan. You would have sworn it was the real thing, except for the acting."

"Actually, it's an easy part, one of the easiest in Shakespeare. Lots of dramatic speeches and few nuances."

"Didn't you do 'Antony and Cleopatra' on Broadway?" somebody asked.

"No," Heston said, "I did 'Caesar and Cleopatra,' Shaw's play. Have you ever been in London and gone to Foyle's Bookstore, the world's largest used bookstore? They tell the story about the day Shaw visited there, and he was browsing through the selection of his own books. He came across a copy which he had autographed 'with compliments,' and given to a friend. And the friend had sold it to Foyle's! Well, Shaw bought it back, inscribed it 'With renewed compliments,' and sent it back to the friend again."

Silence.

"I guess you had to be there," Heston said.


http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080410/PEOPLE/323773696

Recently we lost two American actors who embodied widely different styles, and their passing is a reminder that the very presence of an actor can suggest everything about a film.

Charlton Heston was tall, outward, masculine, exuding bravado, often cast in larger-than-life roles. Richard Widmark was lithe, inward, sardonic. Heston's characters stood on mountaintops and divided the Red Sea. Widmark's often lived in the shadows. Heston played some smaller roles, but there was always the danger he would be too big for them. Widmark often played mainstream roles, but was always more interesting when he was an outsider on the run.

Heston made at least three movies that almost everybody eventually sees: "Ben-Hur, "The Ten Commandments" and "Planet of the Apes." Widmark occupied smaller, darker pieces, and embodied film noir. Many filmgoers may not have seen "Night and the City" or "Panic in the Streets" (both 1950) or "Pickup on South Street" (1953), but if they have, they remember him. All the TV obituaries used that same clip of him pushing an old lady in a wheel chair down a flight of stairs in "Kiss of Death" (1947), his first film, but there was so much more than that.

Heston, raised on Chicago's North Shore, wanted to be an actor almost from the get-go, and made a 16-mm version of "Julius Caesar" in college. "We used all actual locations," he told me in a 1968 interview. "The steps of the Art Institute, the Elk's Temple, the Field Museum, the beaches of Lake Michigan. You would have sworn it was the real thing, except for the acting."

He was "tabbed for stardom," as they used to say, by Cecil B. DeMille, who cast him as him the ringmaster in "The Greatest Show on Earth." which many argue is the worst movie to ever win the Best Picture Oscar, and in 1956 established himself forever in DeMille's "The Ten Commandments." From then on he was often in epics of the sort called "towering," and began to be the victim of self-parody, even though he was always on pitch, and had the heft to carry roles others would have disappeared in. His firm authority makes "Planet of the Apes" (1968) a better film than many, including me, thought at the time.

Widmark's roles were in the middle, not the epic, range. He played cops, robbers, wise guys, military men, horror characters and cowboys, figuring importantly in some of John Ford's elegiac last films. His characters never saved the world, but they usually saved their own skin, and that was the point. He kept a low public profile, made few statements, endorsed few causes, retired so successfully some people were surprised, at the time of his death, that was still alive. Why did the Academy never honor his lifetime achievement?

Heston was very public, very political (first liberal, then conservative), a willing spokesman for what he believed. In early days he led the charge against racist Hollywood hiring policies. In later years he was the voice of the National Rifle Association. It is always tragic when someone suffers from Alzheimer's, but his bravery and grace in publicly acknowledging his illness was dignified and touching.

What intrigues me about Heston is what he might have done had he never met the bombastic Cecil B. DeMille. Seek out a little film named "Will Penny" (1968), which he told me was his personal favorite, to see an entirely different side of his abilities. Or see him in Kenneth Branagh's 1996 "Hamlet," where he embodies the Player King with astonishing invention, transforming conventional ideas about the role.

Probably, DeMille or not, Heston would have found himself in roles of heroic stature; in an industry that focuses on appearances, he looked like the hero, not the best buddy. It took another larger-than-life figure, Orson Welles, to find a channel for that presence, in his "Touch of Evil" (1958).

Widmark stayed within a narrower, more realistic range. He told me in 1968 he treasured his work with the great John Ford in "Cheyenne Autumn" (1964) and "Two Rode Together" (1961). "I'm glad I got him as a director at all," he said almost wistfully. We were speaking at the time of the ascendency of James Bond, and he defended his own pure, straight-ahead film noir: "I have this kind of nostalgia for crime films," he said. "I think we've about exhausted the fancy angles and trick cigarette lighters. Hollywood developed the crime film almost into an art over the years, and it hurt me to see all that work thrown away on spoofs and put-ons."

If Widmark was guarded and private, Heston was outgoing, good company. I remember drinking with him one night at O'Rourke's, the legendary Chicago newspaperman's saloon. He was introduced to Mike McGuire, the military editor of the Chicago Tribune. "Ah, yes," he said. "You supported my policies in the 'Ben Hur' campaign."

Speaking of "Will Penny," he said, "It's one of my favorite roles, because it is real, you see, and not all faked up to make it nice. It even has an unhappy ending." Left unsaid was how many of his films such qualities did not apply to. "I always get the super-hero parts," he said. "That's one nice thing about 'Will Penny.' I'm just an ordinary cowboy, not Ben-Hur in the saddle."

Compared to today's superstars, who are so cosseted and idolized, actors like Heston and Widmark went at their craft full-bore, as solid professionals. They expected to be surrounded by supporting actors, did not monopolize a film, were not marketed as the whole product.

Listen to the gassy profundity of so many of today' stars, analyzing their techniques, and then listen to Widmark describing why John Ford liked making Westerns: "He enjoys working in the fresh air." Or listen to Heston, describing how he mastered the art of Ben-Hur's chariot driving: "Actually, I played it by ear."


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 Post subject: Re: Remembering Charlton Heston
PostPosted: Sun Apr 07, 2013 5:12 pm 
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Damned Dirty Admin
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Great articles, thanks for sharing them!

Question: What drink is a half-and-half?

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 Post subject: Re: Remembering Charlton Heston
PostPosted: Fri Apr 26, 2013 3:04 pm 
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Astronaut

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Found a nice tribute to Heston, at http://selfstyledsiren.blogspot.in/2008 ... -2008.html

"... Charlton Heston was one of the most breathtakingly handsome men in the annals of American cinema. To get his first major role in a big-budget movie, all he had to do was walk across the Paramount lot--Cecil B. DeMille spotted him and presto, Heston was the lead in The Greatest Show on Earth. Heston's was a beauty uniquely suited to epics, so striking, symmetrical and sculpted that no matter how wide you made the screen, how much period paraphernalia you hung around the set or how many good-looking extras you had milling around, he held the gaze.

But if general gorgeousness were all it took to make a memorable performance in an epic, Jeffrey Hunter would have hit King of Kings out of the park. Heston could take a character like Judah Ben-Hur, almost literally a plaster saint, and give him life. Not real life, mind you, but if you wanted reality you didn't seek it at a roadshow engagement. What Heston gave his historical characters was the power of his own belief in them, no matter how improbable the setting. His finely detailed memoirs reveal a man who never wanted for self-respect, and it translated into a screen persona that absolutely demanded your credulity. Heston believed he was Moses, El Cid, a heterosexual Michelangelo, believed it with such burning intensity he swept the audience along. You may question the setting, the special effects, the dialogue, the dialect, the leading lady's eyeliner, but never Heston's absolute conviction in his character.

Several Heston performances outshine the movie itself, such as his George "Chinese" Gordon in Khartoum--a shaky accent but an enjoyable performance that got better notices at the time than did costar Laurence Olivier. He's also the Siren's favorite thing in The Big Country, a movie she loves and has seen many times. Heston's character, the unfortunately named Steve Leech, is often described as a heavy but he's no such thing, just a strong silent type eaten up with love for Carroll Baker and determined not to lose her. Heston often had a lack of chemistry with his leading ladies, perhaps because the diva-esque prerogatives of stars like Sophia Loren and Ava Gardner drove the punctual, meticulous Heston round the bend. But in The Big Country his scenes with Baker smolder, and his longing for her is so nakedly sexual and apparent that you sympathize with Leech long before the character starts to do anything sympathetic.

In his science fiction movies, particularly Planet of the Apes and Soylent Green, Heston's presence gives the viewer something to hang onto amid the dystopia. The world has gone to hell, we're overrun with ragged, starving masses or damned dirty apes, but you pin your hopes on his sheer Charlton Heston-ness. Those shoulders won't bow down no matter how bad things get.

Heston's best work, however, came in his smaller-scale roles. In Will Penny, he reins in all the bigness and toughness and gives a gentle, nuanced portrayal of a hard-up cowhand, falling slowly and fearfully in love with Joan Hackett. When they finally kiss, the Siren's heart turns over. Heston always cited it as his favorite role.

Give Heston credit for something else: the man knew talent when he saw it, and had the courage to back new or underrated directors, as with Will Penny's Tom Gries. Another instance produced another one of his best films, Major Dundee. It's usually described as an interesting failure but the Siren likes this movie a lot, and likes Heston in it, too. When Sam Peckinpah ran into trouble with Columbia, Heston personally intervened, as David Shipman relates, "even offering to return his salary in an attempt to get things right (the studio, to his chagrin, accepted)." Heston was fine indeed as the Major whose harsh drive remains a mystery, unable to enjoy victory or accept defeat, slogging through fight after brutal, senseless fight.



If Charlton Heston had done nothing more in his professional life than to use his influence with Universal to help get Orson Welles the directing job on Touch of Evil, any cinephile worthy of the name would have reason to remember him fondly. The movie is without a doubt the best that Heston ever made, and the Siren wishes people would lay off his accent in it. No, it doesn't sound authentic , but what is important to the film is the way Heston's Mexican police officer counterbalances Welles' corrupt captain in every way. His character is courageous and virtuous, but Heston also plays Mike Vargas as stiff-necked, pompous and a trifle obtuse, the kind of man who would vibrate with righteous indignation if overcharged for the starch in his shirts. Vargas loves his wife and is fighting the good fight against racism and corruption. Yet Heston's performance, with its hint of priggishness, gives us room to see Hank Quinlan as human, with a touch of evil that makes him ultimately more sympathetic.

This week will undoubtedly witness a great deal of back and forth and back again about Heston's politics, given that most people last saw him not in character but at the podium of NRA rallies. But during his career Heston was an actor who approached each role with deep seriousness, repeatedly returning to the stage in between films until the lines would no longer stay in his memory. As the right- and left-wing comments sections runneth over, the Siren recuses herself. Whether you find his late-period activism admirable or appalling, what does it matter what you say about people? He was some kind of a man, but it's the work that endures."

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