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 Post subject: Leonard Nimoy (1931-2015)
PostPosted: Sat Feb 28, 2015 12:07 am 
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Prince Judah
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Leonard Nimoy, ‘Star Trek’s’ Spock, Dies at 83

http://variety.com/2015/tv/news/leonard ... 201443212/
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Leonard Nimoy lived up to his longtime catchphrase: Live long and prosper. Having achieved success in many arenas during his lifetime, the actor, director, writer and photographer died Friday in Los Angeles of end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. He was 83.


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 Post subject: Re: Leonard Nimoy (1931-2015)
PostPosted: Sat Feb 28, 2015 12:11 am 
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Prince Judah
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I heard that he was ill and in the hospital a couple of days ago and got a bad feeling about it; unfortunately, it did turn out bad. However, as mentioned above and detailed below, he had a very successful life and career, not something one would assume based on his early years in the movie business, when it looked like he was destined to go on as a small-time character actor or bit player. Star Trek changed all that and allowed him to expand his interests into other fields: besides photography, poetry and songwriting, he became a big-time film director in the late eighties.

Though best known by a wide margin for his Spock role in Star Trek TV and films, Nimoy's career goes way back to the early fifties, when he made appearances in other sci-fi properties. Many fans site his role in the sci-fi serial Zombies of the Stratosphere (1952) as his start in science fiction; he played an alien.  He also showed up in one scene as an army sergeant in THEM! (54), the one about the giant ants. He was made up as an old man for a small role in The Brain Eaters (58).  Besides such small film roles, Nimoy guested in numerous episodes of various TV series early in his career, such as on Broken Arrow, Sea Hunt, Wagon Train and The Twilight Zone ("Quality of Mercy"). He was in a couple of Outer Limits episodes, including "I Robot" (64) and first appeared with William Shatner in an episode of The Man From U.N.C.L.E. "The Project Strigas Affair" (1964).
STAR TREK "Galileo 7" Image
_____________________ ABOVE: other crew members wait for Spock to explain something, among them
_____________________ James Doohan as Scotty on the left and Deforest Kelley as McCoy on the right


He first played the half human/half Vulcan Spock in the original TV pilot "The Cage" (1965) and it almost ended for Nimoy there. The TV network requested a 2nd pilot and didn't want the Spock character, who looked faintly Satanic. But, Gene Roddenberry favored both the character and the actor, and returned him in the 2nd Star Trek pilot, Where No Man Has Gone Before (1966). Spock was the first officer and science officer aboard the starship Enterprise, commanded by Capt. Kirk (William Shatner) on a voyage of space exploration and patrol. Nimoy as Spock soon proved to be even more popular than Kirk, mostly with female fans who were fascinated by his enigmatic, thoughtful approach and saturnine looks. Nimoy also proved to be a creative participant; he was the one who suggested the Vulcan nerve pinch in an early episode instead of simply striking someone from behind and he came up with the Vulcan hand salute.
The SyFy Channel will honor Nimoy Image
with a 5-hour marathon on March 1st
The Star Trek show was cancelled after 3 seasons and Nimoy might have found himself in limbo and typecast like a few of the other Trek actors, but he immediately got the role of disguise expert Paris on Mission:Impossible for 2 seasons. He then played a bearded villain in the western Catlow (71), which starred Yul Brynner. He also tried his hand at made-for-TV films, such as Baffled and The Alpha Caper (both TV-73), but not nearly as much as Shatner. He provided his voice for the animated version of Star Trek in 1973. He guest starred on TV in Night Gallery and Columbo. In 1975, he had his biography/essay published, "I Am Not Spock" (20 years later, he followed this with the book "I am Spock"). His TV/film appearances petered out in the 2nd half of the decade, as he switched to the stage, to the plays Sherlock Holmes and Equus; just before the first Trek film, he had a supporting role in the Invasion of the Body Snatchers film remake in 1978.
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During all this time in the seventies, the popularity of Star Trek was growing leaps and bounds with Trek conventions and the show being broadcast to a growing legion of fans in syndication. Nimoy returned to the Spock character in the big budget film Star Trek the Motion Picture (79), the first of a 6-movie franchise in which Nimoy would continue to play his signature role. Though his character perished at the end of Star Trek II:The Wrath of Khan (82), he returned in Star Trek III:The Search For Spock (84). This latter film also marked his directorial debut (besides some TV); he expressed an interest in directing and it dovetailed neatly with the question of whether Spock would return. Nimoy experienced even better results with Star Trek IV:The Voyage Home (86), his 2nd try at directing; the film was the most popular of the franchise, gaining an audience outside the usual fan base due to its entertaining nature. Nimoy went on to direct outside the Trek universe: he had a big success with Three Men and a Baby (87) and went on to The Good Mother (88) and Funny About Love (90).
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Nimoy was content to just act in Star Trek V:The Final Frontier (89-Shatner took over directing, with less stellar results), though he also contributed to the story of Star Trek VI:The Undiscovered Country (91). He also played Spock in a couple of episodes of Star Trek TNG ("Unification"), where he was supposedly much older. This seemed to be an end to his famous character, but he popped up again much later in the Star Trek reboot of 2009 and also did a cameo in the 2013 sequel. He was one half of the BIG TWO (with Shatner) in the Star Trek phenomenon which has now spanned 50 years and, with his passing, an era has definitely come to an end. R.I.P.


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 Post subject: Re: Leonard Nimoy (1931-2015)
PostPosted: Sat Feb 28, 2015 9:10 pm 
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I was hoping that you'd make one of these threads for Leonard Nimoy, thank you so much, Chrysagon. Of all the celebrity deaths, Nimoy's is one of the hardest ones to grasp. He was so full of life and was such a big part of the greatest TV-show in history with Star Trek. He was Star Trek personified, people will always think of Spock when they think of Star Trek, it never would have been still going strong if it wasn't for his character. I also enjoy some of his other works I've seen and he was a great director. Watching Wrath of Khan will never be the same again, it will be even more sad.

Nimoy's portrayal of Spock quickly became my favorite of The Original Series (the only Star Trek show I LOVE) and a huge part WHY I love it so much and why I didn't like the other shows as much. When I heard he was going to a convention in England back in 2009, I literally yelled out loud with excitement. I booked everything and then met him some months later. He was very, very kind and looked at you when you spoke to him despite being so busy signing autographs. I got six of them and a photo together with him. I'll always treasure those and the memory of meeting him will be one of the dearest ones I have till the day I die.

R.I.P. Leonard, thank you so much for everything.

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You know, McKay, you're a bigger fool than I thought you were. And to tell you the truth, that just didn't seem possible.


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 Post subject: Re: Leonard Nimoy (1931-2015)
PostPosted: Sat Feb 28, 2015 11:51 pm 
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R.I.P. Leonard Nimoy
:(


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 Post subject: Re: Leonard Nimoy (1931-2015)
PostPosted: Fri Mar 06, 2015 10:34 am 
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Prince Judah
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Detective Thorn wrote:
I was hoping that you'd make one of these threads for Leonard Nimoy, thank you so much, Chrysagon. <> Watching Wrath of Khan will never be the same again, it will be even more sad.

I was planning to watch one of the old Star Trek episodes or one of the films in the past couple of days but I ended up checking out the old Twilight Zone episode he was in "Quality of Mercy." I realized I had the TZ season set - it was a 3rd season episode - and this one had audio commentary by Nimoy. Unfortunately, it was kind of odd - he only spoke during about 5 minutes out of the episode; he mentioned at the start that he never met Rod Serling, even later, when he appeared in and directed a Night Gallery episode. The TZ episode was about a war situation and he spoke mainly about his own army experience and how it was all familiar to him; his was a small supporting role; the stars were Dean Stockwell & Albert Salmi. I also remembered that Nimoy was in a strange TV pilot called "Valley of Mystery" which was done about the same time he started on Star Trek and it also starred his Mission:Impossible co-star Peter Graves; it was like an early version of Lost. I dunno why he was doing this TV pilot while he also was acting in Star Trek (1967 according to IMDb) but maybe it has something to do with the rumor that he may have left the Trek show after the first season. Or, it was a pilot actually done earlier, like 1965. I'm sure I had this TV pilot on video somewhere because I did watch it once a few years ago, but I can't find it now.

Only about an hour ago, I found out that producer Harve Bennett just died, at age 84. I always admired Bennett because he seemed to be one of those producers with a knack for knowing what the public wants or what pleases an audience on the screen. One of his early assignments was The Six Million Dollar Man TV series. He was the one who was assigned the task of getting the Star Trek movie franchise on the right track after everyone became disappointed over the first Star Trek film in 1979, and that's how Star Trek II came about - The Wrath of Khan was the film because Bennett selected the old episode "Space Seed" as the one to follow up on, that and the memorable character of Khan (Ricardo Montalban). You can read about it here - http://deadline.com/2015/03/harve-benne ... 201387026/
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Harve Bennett, the producer who helped guide four of Paramount’s Star Trek movies in the 1980s and produced TV series Mod Squad, The Six Million Dollar Man and The Bionic Woman, died Wednesday in Oregon. He was 84 and becomes the latest key figure lost from the seminal Star Trek franchise following Leonard Nimoy’s death February 27. Bennett then moved to Columbia Pictures Television as a TV producer where his shows included Salvage 1, the miniseries The Jesse Owens Story and A Woman Called Golda, which was Ingrid Bergman’s final role and which co-starred Nimoy. Such creds led Bennett to the Star Trek movie franchise, eventually teaming with director Nicholas Meyer on the second movie in the series, Star Trek: The Wrath Of Khan — which featured the death of Nimoy’s character Spock — after cramming for the writing gig by watching every episode of the TV series. The pic’s success sealed the franchise’s place and led to Bennett producing Star Treks III, IV and V.


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 Post subject: Re: Leonard Nimoy (1931-2015)
PostPosted: Fri Mar 06, 2015 5:10 pm 
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Read about his passing as well today, two people with a huge impact on Star Trek passed within a week of each other. So sad :(

I don't think Nimoy ever left Star Trek after the first season, it's the first I've heard of this rumor. There was a time during the second season where the show was almost sure to be cut short on the ordered episodes for the season but was saved at the last minute. Then when season 2 finished shooting, it was indeed cancelled before Trekkies started a letter writing campaign with the help of Gene Roddenberry, which prompted CBS to order another season.

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You know, McKay, you're a bigger fool than I thought you were. And to tell you the truth, that just didn't seem possible.


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 Post subject: Re: Leonard Nimoy (1931-2015)
PostPosted: Fri Mar 06, 2015 6:44 pm 
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Detective Thorn wrote:
I don't think Nimoy ever left Star Trek after the first season, it's the first I've heard of this rumor. There was a time during the second season where the show was almost sure to be cut short on the ordered episodes for the season but was saved at the last minute. Then when season 2 finished shooting, it was indeed cancelled before Trekkies started a letter writing campaign with the help of Gene Roddenberry, which prompted CBS to order another season.

Sorry, Thorn, I didn't phrase it correctly - no, Nimoy never left the show after the first season. What I meant to say was that there was a rumor that he might leave the show, that he was thinking about it (this was not unusual, especially among the Trek actors, whether having to do with money or some kind of dissatisfaction). That's why I reasoned that he might have done this mysterious TV pilot during his break from Star Trek, while he was thinking things over. But, again, he might have done the pilot in 1964 or 1965, even though it's dated 1967 wherever you look.


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 Post subject: Re: Leonard Nimoy (1931-2015)
PostPosted: Tue Mar 10, 2015 4:42 pm 
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Sorry Chrysagon, I didn't mean to imply that I believed you meant he actually left the show and stopped filming episodes or anything. Anyway, it's an interesting rumor that I had never heard before.

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You know, McKay, you're a bigger fool than I thought you were. And to tell you the truth, that just didn't seem possible.


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