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 Post subject: Re: The Three Musketeers (1973)
PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 2:17 pm 
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Prince Judah
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James Byrne wrote:
I like the way Heston and Christopher Lee play it straight, while Spike Milligan, Roy Kinnear and co. supply the knockabout wacky humour.

This probably sums it up best. The various actors really made this film. I mentioned somewhere earlier on this thread that each had one of their best roles in this film. Heston, Reed, Chamberlain, Lee and a couple of others in smaller roles are the straight men; Finlay, Kinnear, Milligan and the king actor are the clowns. York as D'Artagnan is the central role, bouncing off each of the others as is called for depending on the character (serious or comical). It all works as they play off of each other, striking a great balance; each is near perfect in their roles. The women are gorgeous, with Faye Dunaway providing a rare ultimate female villain. What more could anyone ask for..?


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 Post subject: Re: The Three Musketeers (1973)
PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 2:46 pm 
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Prince Judah
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tizzyd wrote:
And D'Artagnan now knows for certain that Millady is evil, so how will his casual affair with her will take place. The logic of the book is not maintained...

There are a couple of plot points which I admit I always found puzzling, as though a consistent narrative was not maintained between the two films, and one of these is what Tizzy mentions. In the first film, D'Artagnan becomes aware that Milady (Faye Dunaway) is one of his foes; but, early in the 2nd film, he's bedding her as if she is this new lover that has come into his life suddenly and he seems unaware of her evil nature until later. Likewise, it looked like Athos (Oliver Reed) observed Milady by the end of the first film (though maybe he was drunk and oblivious to who she was); however, it's only in the 2nd film that Athos seems to realize who Milady really is.

These inconsistencies almost suggest that these were indeed two seperate films, filmed seperately, and not the one big film that they originally started out as. If it had been one long film, these inconsistencies would have been much more glaring.


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 Post subject: Re: The Three Musketeers (1973)
PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 3:14 pm 
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Prince Judah
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Chrysagon, I think as far as Milady is concerned, the role of Constance also becomes inconsistent. At the end of the novel, Constance is poisoned to death by Milady, and this is her last crime. Constance does not know her nature and so is easily duped to take the drink she gives her. But the version of THE THREE MUSKETEERS we discuss here, shows a clumsy fight between Milady and Constance. That adds mich to the fun-and-action project of the director(two ladies fighting really create much attention and interest), so I agree with you that the two movies are to be seen separately. They are rather free adaptations, not literary adaptations.

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 Post subject: Re: The Three Musketeers (1973)
PostPosted: Sun Jul 22, 2012 11:11 pm 
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Michelangelo

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The British screen and stage actor Simon Ward has died after a long illness, his agent has confirmed.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-18947130
Quote:
Ward, who was 70, appeared in several films throughout the 1970s and 1980s, including The Three Musketeers.
......


Ward played the Duke of Buckingham in The Three Musketeers and in The Four Musketeers.

R.I.P. Simon Ward


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 Post subject: Re: The Three Musketeers (1973)
PostPosted: Mon Jul 23, 2012 12:24 am 
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Prince Judah
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I just learned of this only about half-an-hour before coming over to this board just now. Besides the Musketeers films, Simon Ward had one of his biggest starring roles in the prequel Zulu Dawn (1979), which also starred Burt Lancaster in a role that would have suited Heston well (anyone else notice how most of Heston's and Lancaster's roles could be played well by either actor?). Ward was also in a very good TV version of The Four Feathers in 1978 and had his first important starring role in Young Winston (1972). His Duke role in the Musketeers films was not as splashy as most of the starring roles in those, but he was sort of winking at the audiemce along with Heston and the others. Ward was one of the better known British young stars during the seventies but after that decade his career petered out a bit and he was in small supporting roles in the eighties and onward.


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 Post subject: Re: The Three Musketeers (1973)
PostPosted: Sat Oct 05, 2013 4:54 am 
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Prince Judah
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Here is something about THE THREE MUSKETEERS which my big brother War Lord may find interesting...along with a photo of Chuck with Richard Lester, the director. The link-- http://www.capedwonder.com/director-richard-lester/

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Ilya Salkind was a fan of A Hard Day’s Night and decided that Lester would be a good choice to film Dumas’s The Three Musketeers. At first the auteur dismissed the notion, believing it was a kid’s story, but once he read the original novel he was sold. This time he had an opportunity to direct a commercial project, one which provided an opportunity for Lester to magnify his unique style to a much larger audience. Originally intended to be ONE film, in the spirit of the roadshow events of the 50s and 60s — but with a pre-sold release date to make in nine weeks after shooting finished, Lester flippantly told the producers that they could have half. So it was decided that the film be split into two. With lawsuits flying, the producers gave them [actors] a percentage of the sequel. Far removed from the Hollywood version, his two films showed that his iconoclastic nature was truly alive, he brought the lavish and romantic wonder of Dumas’s characters down to Earth — their environment gritty and grimy, a more realistic portrait of 17th century Europe. Lester excelled in making sure the sword fights were real, and they used real weapons, capturing some of the best swashbuckling fighting ever on film. His Musketeers are valued as the definitive filmed versions of the Dumas classic, marrying sincere adventure, slapstick comedy and remarkable period detail.

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