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 Post subject: Interviews with Chuck
PostPosted: Wed Dec 07, 2011 3:30 am 
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Prince Judah
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He speaks to us. He lets us have a glimpse into his worlds.--- through interviews.

Here's one for all friends to enjoy--

The legendary Charlton Heston grants Mr. Showbiz a rare peek into his world: (Mr. Showbiz website)
By Rick Schultz
(Given in:1995)

CHARLTON HESTON turned seventy-two early last month, but he shows no signs of slowing down. He has had recent roles in Tombstone, Wayne's World 2, and True Lies, and plans to appear in Kenneth Branagh's upcoming film version of Hamlet. He also has a CD-ROM coming out this Christmas based on the Bible series he did for Arts & Entertainment, and has just published a six-hundred-page autobiography titled In the Arena. ("My best work? I don't know, my career isn't over yet.")

His imposing stature and commanding voice--he played Moses in The Ten Commandments, after all--have lost little power over the years, but he admits that he is not fearless. His scariest career moment occurred during the filming of Ben-Hur, directed by William Wyler. ("Willie Wyler dropped into my dressing room ten days into the shoot and said, 'Chuck, you have to be better for me in this part.' I have always been very confident about any part I did, but that was tough.")

He says that despite his public life, he is a shy man. ("Many actors are--Olivier, for instance. Singers and comics have to be outgoing because they're talking directly to the audience. Actors hide behind a character.")

He has many opinions about trends in modern movies, and would have made a fine film critic. He does not appreciate excess for its own sake, in movies or in life. He thinks manners count very much. ("One of the problems of our time is the gradual erosion of civil discourse--comity, if you like. I don't know why it's disappeared, but people are very brusque with each other; I take some pains to call strangers to whom I speak 'Sir' or 'Ma'am.'")

He was once a Democrat, but suddenly switched parties in the sixties. ("It wasn't me that changed, it was the Democratic Party that slid sharply to the left and right out from under me. My views are still what Jack Kennedy ran on.") He has been approached about running for the Senate, at different times, by both parties. ("But I'd have to give up acting, and I was not--and am not--prepared to do that.")

He was born Charles Carter on October 4, 1923, in a suburb of Chicago, at Evanston Community Hospital, to Russell Whitford Carter and Lilla Charlton. He does not remember the name of the doctor who delivered him. ("I have no memory for names, numbers, addresses, or faces. My memory is for recording--transferring into my memory--printed text, lines from a play, dialogue.")

He also doesn't remember the house he first lived in. ("I think my parents took me back to Michigan before I was a year old. I have no memory of that at all. The house I lived in my boyhood in Michigan, as far as I know, still stands, and it's a modest bungalow in the woods.") When he was ten, his parents divorced. His mother later remarried. His stepfather's name was Chet Heston.

He enjoyed high school, but regrets that he did not make more of it. ("I was a hick kid from the woods who didn't really fit in there until I discovered the drama program. Unhappily, since I have a strong mnemonic faculty, it was easy for me to slide through to the easy Bs. If I'd really worked, I could have gotten an education you can't get in some colleges now. But high school led me to my career. It was where I first studied acting.")

His work in theatre won him a scholarship to the School of Speech at Northwestern University, where he met Lydia, his wife of fifty-plus years. He finessed his way into a small part on Broadway in Katharine Cornell's stage production of Antony and Cleopatra. His dream project would be to remake his largely unsuccessful 1973 film version of Antony and Cleopatra, which he directed. ("Cleopatra may be unplayable because it's the greatest woman's part--there's just too much to her.")

He has a lot of good things to say about fame. ("It has complicated my life a little, but not enormously. I had to learn to be a public person, but fame has given me a good deal of control over my career, which I otherwise would not have had. Also, chances to work with some extraordinary men and women.")

He has always been a physical, hands-on actor, but he recalls sharing a moment of uncertainty about riding an open chariot pulled by a team of horses for the thrilling chariot race sequence in Ben-Hur. ("The great stuntman Yakima Canutt looked at me and said, 'Chuck, you just make sure you stay in the chariot. I guarantee you're gonna win the damn race.'")

He still works out on a regular basis. ("I do a forty-minute pool workout every morning, and I have an exercycle. When you're eighteen, you don't have to work out. As an actor, I realized I had to keep my body in shape.") He is not sure how to go about getting more Americans in shape. ("It's terrible what's happening. I read an article about fat little kids. People are apparently starving to death and yet we see fat kids.")

He considers himself "choreographically challenged." ("I dance terribly, but when the great ballet star Robert Helpmann coached me and Ava Gardner on 55 Days at Peking, I did wonderfully. I just didn't learn it young enough to ever be comfortable doing it.")

He claims he has never tasted a bagel. ("Wherever there are bagels, there are also English muffins, bran muffins, and toast, and I'm more familiar with that. Bagels always seemed quite tough when you looked at them.") He likes to eat steak, fish, chicken, peanut butter and rice. ("We don't really eat desserts anymore--weight control. Fruit's okay.")

He wears nothing to bed, and can work with only minimal sleep. ("I can do quite well over the short run. For a few days, I can get by on five or six hours a night. I prefer seven, but I don't need more than that, and I never take more.") He's six-foot-three and somewhere over two hundred pounds, so it's no surprise to hear about his bed. ("I sleep in a very, very large one."

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 Post subject: Re: Interviews with Chuck
PostPosted: Wed Dec 07, 2011 3:38 am 
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This one I enjoyed greatly, Chuck here speaks about his views on art, culture , literature, cinematic aesthetics and national spirit.

An Interview With Charlton Heston
Dialogues
October 06, 1995

by: Ken Masugi


Charlton Heston is one of the most respected and honored actors in the world. He pursued his ambition throughout high school and then college, via an acting scholarship at Northwestern University.

Following Northwestern, Heston enlisted in the army for three years before moving to New York to continue his career. He made his Broadway debut as a cast member of Katherine Cornell’s Antony and Cleopatra, performing a number of roles during the play’s long and successful run. His performances caught the eye of several directors in the then new medium of television, and he became one of the first Broadway actors to achieve success on television, playing leads in Studio One and other live dramatic programs.

He first drew Holly-wood’s attention after playing Antony in David Brad-ley’s widely acclaimed version of Julius Caesar. This performance convinced Cecil B. DeMille to sign him for The Greatest Show on Earth. The film went on to win the Oscar for Best Picture of the Year, and Heston was on his way.

A conscientious citizen, Heston takes an active part in community and film industry affairs. He’s made numerous trips overseas on behalf of the State Department and has visited troops in foreign countries. He was also president of the Screen Actors’ Guild for six terms (longer than anyone else has held the office) and went on to be Chairman of the American Film Institute. In 1978, for these and other special services, he received the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

This interview was conducted by Ken Masugi, Senior Fellow, and Colleen Ryor, Ashbrook Scholar and Assistant Managing Editor of On Principle.

QUESTION: Could you address the question of how the arts can assist us in strengthening our national character?

CHARLTON HESTON: Shakespeare is the outstanding example of how that can be done. In all of Shakespeare’s plays, no matter what tragic events occur, no matter what rises and falls, we return to stability in the end. Society mends its wounds. And that’s invariably true in all the tragedies, in the comedies as well. And certainly in the histories.

I think you see it less clearly in painting, though there, too ... the paintings up through the 19th century tended to be paintings of great events which came to a successful conclusion, but not invariably: We see paintings of the flood, and so forth ... the destruction of the Golden Calf. But those too came out satisfactorily in the end ... the Lord sets his rainbow in the sky and says, "Never again will I cause a flood to come upon the earth."

To a lesser extent that’s true in the novel. But again, through the 19th century, given extraordinary and undeniably great exceptions like Moby ****, which has a tragic ending, most great novels close with a somewhat benign view of the world, not so when you get into Theodore Dreiser, when it begins to change. I suppose you see it more and more in our times now, with ... well, I can describe it more securely and in greater detail in film, which obviously I’ve been more intimately involved with than 19th century novels, except as a consumer of them.

Q: What’s your favorite 19th century novel?

CH: I think Huckleberry Finn is one of the great American novels and I’d go with that. Moby ****, of course. Moby **** is much denser, and frankly, a lot of it is quite boring.

The big studio era is from the coming of sound until 1950, until I came in ... I came in at a crux in film, which was the end of the studio era and the rise of filmmaking. But throughout all that period, the difference between good and evil, and the eventual triumph of the good, the reward of the virtuous, of the heroic, was almost always recognized. You could think of extraordinary examples to the contrary: The Grapes of Wrath ... and even into the 70s.

Dirty Harry, for example. Clint Eastwood was not a rogue cop. He was a maverick cop, but he was a good guy. His superiors were often forced to rebuke him or even discipline him, but we knew who were the good guys and who were the bad guys. About the same time, Robert Redford made a good film called Three Days of the Condor, and that was about the turning point, I think. Certainly Jimmy Cagney, Humphrey Bogart, and Eddie Robinson, played monstrously bad men, but they get killed in the end. Now we see, more and more, anyone in the military, for example, above the rank of major, is likely to be a bad man. Clergymen tend to be unreliable and pompous figures. Seldom Jewish rabbis, less often Catholic priests, but Protestant ministers tend to be ... not really very admirable. Not necessarily evil, but silly. And wrong, of course.

In recent years, anyone in the government, certainly anyone in the FBI or the CIA, or recently, in again, Clint’s film, In the Line of Fire, the main bad guy is the chief advisor to the president. And more recently in that film Dave, at least sort of a comedy, but the president is a bad man a terrible man.

Q: It seems that even when we get patriotic writers like Tom Clancy, people at least in an early stage like Clint Eastwood who did some very good movies, that support American principles, Hollywood somehow manages to distort them. First of all, how do you see it from inside the film industry, and second, what can Americans do to object?

CH: Well the main thing they can do is not go to the movies. It is an odd dilemma. On the one hand, film is the art form of the 20th century, undeniably ... As Lenin said, "the most powerful tool ever invented to influence the mind of man." Undeniably the American art form, too. And yet more and more, we see films made that diminish the American experience and example. And sometimes trash it completely.

I suppose Oliver Stone is the outstanding example of that ... He’s a very good film maker, but ruthlessly critical of the American scene take Natural Born Killers, JFK ... And, you see a film maker like Quentin Tarantino ... Pulp Fiction is very well made, rather flashily directed, with a lot of jump cuts and double cuts and reverse time sequences and so on; you’re never in a certain time in the film. But all that is given; it’s still wonderfully made. The bad guys are the good guys, really ...

Now what Tarantino will say to that is "Don’t you understand? This is a black comedy. We’re holding this up to ridicule." There’s no worse thing you can accuse a cool person of being than not getting a joke. So they’ll say "Oh, yeah, right, sure ... it’s a black comedy. Right."

Q: Well, this brings us, of course, to the National Endowment for the Arts, and of course it’s been under very heavy fire for some well-publicized grants that it gave. But it gives money to support wonderful museums and art exhibits ...

CH: You cut their money back, for one thing.... I go back a long way with the NEA. Then I was appointed by President Reagan to chair a presidential commission on the arts, to determine if it was appropriate to give federal tax money to both these endowments. In the end we decided that there was a sufficiently national function served, and that they should have some money.

Then I was involved in some of the flops on the Mapplethorpe and Serrano thing, and the AIDS activist last spring who sprinkled his blood. And that is one of the weaknesses, as I’ve said to several chairmen of the NEA: "If you annoy a certain number of taxpayers, their representatives will not give you any money. You must, must, must prevent these grants."

The problem is what they call the peer review panel, which are in fact, panels of some artists, arts activists, people that donate money and support, arts administrators executives, directors, and sub-directors, and so on. And in effect, they are advisory on every grant in consideration. For the council which in theory has to approve a grant has too heavy a workload. When I was on it, you know, you’d get close to lunchtime and the chairman would say, "Well, we’re supposed to run this film this afternoon, and it’s coming on to lunch the Chair will entertain a motion to approve these fourteen grants" and someone’ll say, "Yeah, I move to approve ..." The panelists can’t submit a request for a grant. But they rotate on and off the panel. And their pals vote for their stuff when they’re not on the panel, and it just keeps going that way. And they tend to be very fringe artists, so anything before the 20th century is not worth considering. This is out of date.

Q: It’s the permanent staff that pushes this agenda and the only way you get rid of them is by eliminating the agency altogether. The public is edified by great art. Does that necessarily require a governmental mechanism to facilitate that noble end?

CH: Well, we have certainly produced great art before we did this. In my view, there are any number of areas of government which tax money should not be spent. I think farm subsidies are certainly at least as hard to justify as giving some out-of-work painter a thousand dollars to do a mural. As an artist, I understand that, and I value the creative input of the artist. The United States Marine Corps Band takes more tax money than all the grants to symphony orchestras by the NEA, so there’s a certain perspective there that’s understandable. These are ridiculous, foolish grants dangerously foolish. Most of which are made precisely to irritate the Philistine.

Q: The great French impressionist artist Degas said, "Our mission must be to discourage art." Are the arts doomed to bumble along in this way, to continue to deteriorate as the definition of art and the elitists who define what good art is ... try to shock the bourgeoise more and more?

CH: Art as confrontational politics I don’t think is the function of art. Now there are artists who disagree with me; they say that’s precisely the function of the artist. The function of art is to provide the bread of the soul, to inspire, to elevate, to think better of the world, and ourselves.

Q: What makes you proudest to be an American?

CH: My country’s history. I don’t know who it was that said it, but it may be that the creation of the United States is the greatest political act in the history of mankind. I agree with that. Good question. No one’s ever asked me that before.

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 Post subject: Re: Interviews with Chuck
PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2012 4:46 am 
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From the November 4, 1959 edition of The Christian Science Monitor

No matter how you look at Charlton Heston, who wheels a chariot 35 miles an hour in Ben-Hur, he is quite an eyeful. In costume, his white teeth gleaming and his face taut with expression, he makes a superlative movie actor. His private character is a mixture of candor, pride, and personality.

Some MGM publicity man got the idea that since chariot racing is a sport - or was back in Ben-Hur's day - that no self-respecting historian of the sports arena could possibly resist the opportunity to interview Charlton.

Five sports writers showed up yesterday at the Ritz-Carlton and met a man who wanted to be an actor since he was a little boy and once played end for Northwestern.

COLLEGE FRESHMAN

"I was a college freshman," Heston confessed, "and since I'd played football in high school it seemed only logical to try football at Northwestern. The varsity quarterback that year was Otto Graham. But after we'd scrimmaged Graham and his playmates a few times I decided I might not live long enough to be an actor. In two words, I quit."

Asked to describe chariot racing, Heston said it was both rough and demanding. He still has calluses on his hands from gripping four sets of reins and he spent five weeks with Hollywood stunt man Yakima Canutt learning to pilot a team of horses before shooting even began.

COULDN'T BELIEVE IT

"I had ridden before," Heston said, "but handling four powerful horses while standing erect in a half-ton chariot was something entirely foreign to me. The toughest part was learning to skid around the turns and if you looked back there was always a horse at your shoulder.

"At first I couldn't believe it when Bill Wyler, our director, told me it was impossible to overturn - that the chariots had been designed not to lift. But he knew what he was talking about and those that do flip in the picture had to be specially rigged with a powder charge.

"Actually the stance I assume when I'm driving," Chuck explained, "is almost like that of a skier. It gets pretty crowded, too, with nine of us racing and the wheel hubs of most of the chariots are equipped with steel knives.

"When a rival driver puts his hub against your oak spokes, even though they are three inches thick, it take sonly about half a lap to break through. Back in those days the boys really played for keeps."

Heston handles a press conference extremely well. He looks straight at you when he speaks and he give it the informal touch by asking questions himself.

WEIGHT A PROBLEM

Weight for him, he said, is a problem. He works out every day in the gym, even when he's traveling, and often plays four or five set of hard tennis. He spend most of his free time on the coast with his wife and four-year-old son, but he has an apartment in New York and 1,400 acres of woods and fields in Michigan.

You get the impression that Chuck likes his work and that he'll tackle just about anything. Football scares him, he says, but he likes baseball and roots for the Milwaukee Braves.

Standing 6-foot-2 and weighing 206 pounds, Heston makes an imposing picture. He was born in 1926, the year MGM released its first version of Ben-Hur.

Is the present picture any better? "Well," said Chuck, "it took 11 months to shoot and it cost a lot more." It was the first time he resorted to acting all afternoon.

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 Post subject: Re: Interviews with Chuck
PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2012 4:27 pm 
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Thank you so much tizzy. I really liked this interview.

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 Post subject: Re: Interviews with Chuck
PostPosted: Sun Mar 25, 2012 4:20 am 
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Chuck talks about 'Touch of Evil' in an interview-- http://www.urbancinefile.com.au/home/vi ... Interviews

HESTON, CHARLTON: Touch of Evil

BEST B-MOVIE EVER MADE
In an interview with our special contributor SUE VERMILIONS, Charlton Heston describes how the editing of Touch of Evil was originally completed by Universal in Orson Welles' absence. As a result the film was released with the credits partially obscuring its astonishingly complex single-take opening (a virtuoso shot that has since become part of Hollywood lore.

Q: What do you think of the new cut of Touch of Evil?

A: It is, I think, probably closer to the film Orson had in mind. There are no new shots: the shots that he made and the couple of shots the studio made were always there - it's a question of how you cut them, how you edit them, and I'm very pleased with the work as it stands now. And I think Orson would be.

Q. Do you think it's better than the previously released cut, or just different?

A. Maybe the outstanding example, the best single shot in the whole picture, one of the historic shots in all of film, is the opening sequence. And in the original, not very successful release of the film as the studio had finally cut it, that plays behind the credits and you can hardly make out the shot. That was just ridiculous. That alone is worth all the work of reassembling the picture.

When Orson was shooting the film, Universal was absolutely delighted with what they saw; for one thing, that he was able to shoot so fast. And they made an offer of a 5-picture deal with him, of which Touch of Evil was to be the first. But then he walked off in the middle of editing, which is a really bad no-no, to try to raise money for a film of Don Quixote that he wanted to do with me. That was very nice, but he should have waited till he'd turned in his director's cut to do that, because that opened a gulf with the studio that was never filled."

Q: Can you describe the circumstances under which you and Welles were engaged to work on the film? I understand that Universal had sent you a couple of scripts, of which one was adapted by Paul Monash from a little-known novel by Whit Masterton called Badge of Evil – and that Orson would later rewrite the script without having read the novel after the studio took up your suggestion that he direct.

A: They called me after a few days and asked if I had read it (the Monash script). I said 'Yeah, it's OK. It's a police story and they've been making police stories by the dozen for 40 years, so it really depends on who's directing it.' They said 'We don't have a director yet.'

Q: And you suggested Orson?

A: In a sense my major contribution – and possibly my major contribution to the film medium, is that.
(Heston then describes how after they had finished shooting the picture in Venice, California and when they were sitting around congratulating each other on 'how marvellously we'd done', Heston says he told him: 'You know Orson, I'm delighted to have done this. I've learned a great deal, but really you only made one mistake. There are two or three short scenes in the film only to demonstrate that I have the leading role. I should in fact (have known) as you certainly know, this story is about the decline and fall of Captain Quinlan (Welles' role). 'Man, I knew that,' he said. (Heston adapts a gravelly Wellesian voice), 'Well, I don't have to worry about that in the cutting, do I?'

Q: Many people have praised the astonishingly seedy performances Welles gives, where you can almost smell the corruption coming off him. What did you think of his performance?

A: It was wonderful. One of his best performances perhaps this side of Citizen Kane, his best performance.

Q: Did his reputation as a director over-shadow his reputation as an actor?

A: Oh, I think he was a better director than an actor, though he was a good actor – very good, if you like. He wasn't Lawrence Olivier. Although the Falstaff he did in Chimes of Midnight is very good. That whole film is good.

Q: In your autobiography In the Arena, you wrote that Orson making a film was different to Orson between films. What did you mean by that?

A: Well he was great fun, but it could be difficult sometimes to keep him focussed on a given project until he actually had the money to do it. There's nothing wrong with that. But he was very good company to be around. If he was at a table of 10 people, why he would dominate the conversation; but he would say more interesting things than anybody else had to say.

Q: Where would you rank Touch of Evil among the pictures you've made?

A: Oh, gosh, that I'm asked all the time, and I don't really know the answer because I've made primarily three categories of films. I'm very proud of the fact that I've made more Shakespearian films than any other American actor and that I've played a fair number of films that have made huge amounts of money, which means you get the chance to make more films. And I've done more historical characters, genuinely great men, than, as far as I can tell, any American actor. So that's all three different categories. And where Touch of Evil would fit in there, I don't know. Certainly the chance to work with Orson – I learned a lot from him. An offhand example. One time he said in the middle of a shot (adapts Wellesian voice), 'Chuck, you know, those of us with these lovely bass voices love to rumble along – you've got to work on your tenor range a little, Chuck.' I took it to heart, and I did.

Q: Have you seen the influence of this film on other movies – a lot of people have commented on the motel scene's apparent influence on Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho, which also featured Janet Leigh?

A: Well, no, (it's) the opening sequence that other directors have copied. It's a great shot, no question. The motel scene is Ok. It's a good scene, but to compare it to the opening sequence – that's an incredible shot.

Q: How was Janet Leigh, who played your character's new American wife, to work with?

A: Janet Leigh was fine to work with. Actually if you think back to the film, we are separate almost all the time, after the opening sequence. I only see her in the jail and then at the very end. Janet is fine in the part and she had a cracked wrist that she was working with.

Q: In your book, you wrote that maybe Orson had too much talent. What did you mean by that?

A: I don't know if I said 'too much talent'. How can you have too much talent? I think so many things were so easy for him creatively, that he must have felt he was constantly stopping in his tracks and waiting for everbody else to catch up. But I loved working with him.

Q: What are the qualities that Touch of Evil has that make it a special film, do you think?

A: It's a fine film. It is the best B movie ever made. B movies are a separate genre and to make a great B movie is extraordinary.

Q: Of course Hollywood now routinely takes B movie plots and spends $100 million making them.

A: Well sometimes they don't turn out.

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 Post subject: Re: Interviews with Chuck
PostPosted: Tue Mar 27, 2012 4:49 pm 
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Here is another interview, and again--- on 'The Touch of Evil'. I am sorry to make this a boring thread, so I think it is better to give the link-- http://www.seanax.com/2008/04/06/rememb ... the-actor/

And I would just quote one amusing account:

Question:I was wondering how much, having found the locations and more importantly getting the actors on location, how much he would then use what he found around him to start tweaking things.

Chuck: Well, you do that normally. That’s not unique to Orson. Obviously you, no matter how carefully you’ve built a set or chosen a location, when you actually come to shooting the scenes, why you discover other possibilities within the bounds of where you’re shooting. For instance, in this hotel we were shooting late one night into the night and it was, oh I don’t know, 2:00 in the morning, and we still had a little bit of stuff to do and Orson and I were down in the basement, there was no men’s room in the lobby, and we went down in the basement and were peeing in a drain in the corner, and he said “You know this is a great area down here.” He says “We ought to use this. Wouldn’t this be great for the scene between you and Joe Calleia when he gives you my cane?” And I said “Yeah, that would be great, but I think the studio’s got it scheduled for Monday and they must have built a set on the lot.” He said, “Yeah, this is much better though. We’ll just get Joe down here.” I said “Orson, for God’s sakes, he going to be in bed. It’s 2:00 in the morning.” He said “No, it’ll be good because he’ll be all upset and stumbly when he gets down here.” And so he did and we shot the scene down there, but before I had said “But Orson, you’ve got three more shots to make right now as it is.” He says “I don’t need those shots. We can skip those shots. I can cut the scene together without those.” But it was a great place to shoot the scene and it helps the picture. So that’s an example of taking example of a location after you’ve chosen it.

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 Post subject: Re: Interviews with Chuck
PostPosted: Sun Apr 08, 2012 1:09 pm 
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Hi mates. Here's the link to a quite informative and intimate interview. It runs for three pages, so just click on the link and go to the next pages when you finish the first one. http://www.ew.com/ew/article/0,,20189905,00.html

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 Post subject: Re: Interviews with Chuck
PostPosted: Tue Apr 10, 2012 1:27 pm 
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Thank you Tizzy, for the link. This is really a valuable interview. I especially liked that part when Chuck nostalgically recalls that only his mother and DeMille used to call him 'Charlton'. Wonderful sentiments.

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 Post subject: Re: Interviews with Chuck
PostPosted: Sat Apr 21, 2012 5:16 am 
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Charlton Heston's interview for The Omega Man can be found at;

http://www.iamlegendarchive.com

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 Post subject: Re: Interviews with Chuck
PostPosted: Mon Apr 23, 2012 11:59 am 
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Really a great interview, thank you ch1. There is also interesting comments on 'Soylent Green' and POTA. But it is rather painful to see how Chuck is forgetting things --to see those sad symptoms of his last illness, God!

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