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 Post subject: Re: Heston vs. Brando - Film Career Comparison
PostPosted: Mon Aug 26, 2013 7:15 pm 
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Prince Judah
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James Byrne wrote:
Chrysagon, what a terrific post! It was not only enlightening but also very entertaining - I really enoyed it.
You missed out the fact that Heston and Brando both appeared on the post-war Broadway stage with the "First Lady of the Theatre", Katharine Cornell. Brando appeared with the great Cornell in CANDIDA (April 1946) and a couple of years later Heston made his Broadway debut with Cornell in ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA.
Heston played Brando's role in the Lux Radio version of VIVA ZAPATA (which I own) and, exactly 50 years ago, 28 August 1963, they both campaigned for Civil Rights with Martin Luther King.

Thanks, James.
I concentrated on the film history, so I didn't consider their work on stage or real life political events, but your points are well taken.
Since Heston & Brando collaborated on their Civil Rights campaigning, this represents the rare time they actually appeared together
(documented in photos - and there's footage of a roundtable on a TV show), as they never did a film together.


Last edited by Chrysagon on Mon Aug 26, 2013 9:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Heston vs. Brando - Film Career Comparison
PostPosted: Mon Aug 26, 2013 7:38 pm 
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Prince Judah
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With the magic of copy-and-paste, here is the revised & expanded timeline:

1950: Brando's film debut in the small b&w The Men; Heston's 1st pro film, a small b&w noir Dark City
--------- actor Jack Webb co-stars in both films

1951: Brando becomes a big star in A Streetcar Named Desire; Heston appears in a few TV roles for Studio One

1952: Brando plays a Mexican revolutionary rebel in Viva Zapata! ;
_____ Heston plays The Savage rebel and becomes a star in DeMille's Greatest Show on Earth

1953: Brando plays Antony in Julius Caesar and a biker outlaw in The Wild One, fighting other bikers;
_____ Heston plays Andrew Jackson in The President's Lady and fights Indians in a couple of westerns

1954: Brando wins his 1st Oscar as Terry for On the Waterfront and plays Napoleon in Désirée;
_____ Heston plays a Napoleon of the Amazon in The Naked Jungle and wins cult fame as Harry in Secret of the Incas

1955: Brando tries his hand at a musical comedy in Guys and Dolls with Sinatra;
_____ Heston tries his hand at comedy in The Private War of Major Benson

1956: Brando plays a Japanese interpreter for his people in The Teahouse of the August Moon;
_____ Heston plays Moses in the huge The Ten Commandments and becomes a big star

1956-1957: Heston stars as Capt. Colt in Three Violent People, co-starring Anne Baxter
__________ Brando stars as a Major in Sayonara, co-starring Martha Scott

1958: Brando plays a German soldier in the b&w war film The Young Lions, with Montgomery Clift;
_____ Heston plays a Mexican detective in the b&w crime noir Touch of Evil, with Orson Welles

1959: Brando plays a drifter in the small b&w film The Fugitive Kind (he'd turned down the Ben-Hur role);
_____ Heston is in the biggest film of the year, Ben-Hur, wins an Oscar and becomes an epic superstar

1961: Brando stars in and directs the epic western One-Eyed Jacks, he plays crook Rio;
_____ Heston stars in the epic El Cid as Rodrigo; it out-grosses One-Eyed Jacks several times over

1962: Brando stars in the epic Mutiny on the Bounty; Heston returns to comedy in The Pigeon That Took Rome
_____ but, Brando is only a 1st Lieutenant in his film under Capt. Bligh, while Heston plays a Captain in his film

1963: Brando plays an ambassador in The Ugly American, about a civil war in a foreign land;
_____ Heston plays a soldier helping an ambassador in 55 Days at Peking, during civil war in China;
_____ Heston & Brando campaign for Civil Rights with Martin Luther King in Washington DC

1964-1965: Brando stars in the comedy Bedtime Story; Heston plays John the Baptist,
__________ a small role in the epic The Greatest Story Ever Told

1965: Brando again plays a German during the big war in Morituri, also starring Yul Brynner;
_____ Heston plays a big War Lord and an Italian in The Agony and the Ecstasy, also starring Rex Harrison

1965-1966: Heston's western is the big Major Dundee; Brando's is the small The Appaloosa
-------------- in both cases, their characters have to head down to Mexico to resolve things

1966
: Brando tries to maintain the peace (as a sheriff) in a small town in The Chase;
_____ Heston tries to maintain the peace (as a general) in the Sudan in Khartoum

1967: Brando helps a countess escape the Russians in A Countess From Hong Kong;
_____ Heston helps his orchestra escape the Germans in Counterpoint

1968: Brando plays a kidnapper in the thriller Night of the Following Day - it flops;
_____ Heston plays an astronaut in the sci-fi Planet of the Apes - it's a huge hit;
_____ also, Brando's low point - a weird guru in Candy? Heston's high point - Will Penny?

1969-1970: Brando tries to mess things up on a Caribbean island in Burn! (Quiemada)
_________ Heston tries to keep order on the Hawaiian islands in The Hawaiians

1970: Heston & Brando appear in the documentary, King: A Filmed Record... Montgomery to Memphis

1971: Brando is the victim of murderous kids in the spooky The Nightcomers;
_____ Heston helps kids and is the victim of murderous mutants in the spooky The Omega Man

1972: Brando's comeback and 2nd Oscar - maybe his best film - in The Godfather;
_____ Heston is in what he feels may be his worst film, a version of The Call of the Wild

1972-1973: Brando has a Last Tango in Paris; Heston is a Cardinal in Paris in The Three Musketeers

1974-1975: Brando disappears from film;
__________Heston has a couple of his biggest hits - Airport 1975 & Earthquake

1976: Brando's western-The Missouri Breaks; Heston's is The Last Hard Men - both flop

1977: Brando in aired expanded The Godfather:A Novel For Television, as king of a Mafia family, Don Vito Corleone;
_____ Heston plays King Henry VIII in Crossed Swords, a.k.a. a new version of The Prince and the Pauper.

1978: Heston stars in Gray Lady Down, with Christopher Reeve in a small role;
_____ Brando has a small role in Superman, starring Christopher Reeve in the title role

1978-1979: Heston is interviewed in mock fashion on an episode of the TV show America 2-Night;
_____ Brando plays Rockwell of the American Nazi Party, interviewed in Roots:The Next Generations on TV

1979-1980: Brando is bald in Apocalypse Now and The Formula;
_________ Heston is bearded in The Mountain Men and The Awakening

1988-1989: Heston plays a 16th-century lawyer against the king's tyranny in A Man For All Seasons;
__________ Brando plays a lawyer up against the tyranny of Apartheid in A Dry White Season

1989-1990: Heston plays a Mafia Godfather in the TV Movie Original Sin;
_________ Brando parodies his own Godfather role in The Freshman

1992: Heston appears in the unfinished epic Gengis Khan;
_____ Brando appears in the finished epic Christopher Columbus:The Discovery

1994: Brando is placed in charge of Johnny Depp to defeat his delusions, in Don Juan DeMarco;
_____ Heston is in charge of Schwarzenegger to defeat real terrorists, in True Lies, and
_____ he's also in charge of Sam Neill In the Mouth of Madness, in which it's not just delusions

1996: Brando is a crazy scientist on a tropical island wilderness in The Island of Dr.Moreau;
_____ Heston is a crazy poacher in the cold snowy wildernesss, in Alaska

1998: Brando forces two fools into a shotgun wedding in Free Money;
_____ Heston narrates Armageddon, in which Bruce Willis uses a shotgun to stop a wedding

2001: Brando helps pro thief Edward Norton with his biggest score in The Score;
_____ Heston helps pro thief Van Damme with his search for his father in The Order

2003-2004: Heston caps off his film career as Josef Mengele in My Father Rua Alguem 5555;
_____ Brando films a series of classes teaching star actors called "Lying For a Living" but passes away;
_____ the DVDs are never released; Heston's last film never gets a theatrical release, but is on DVD...


Last edited by Chrysagon on Fri May 02, 2014 9:29 am, edited 6 times in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Heston vs. Brando - Film Career Comparison
PostPosted: Mon Aug 26, 2013 9:30 pm 
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Michelangelo

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Wonderful post Chrysagon :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

:cheers:


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 Post subject: Re: Heston vs. Brando - Film Career Comparison
PostPosted: Mon Aug 26, 2013 9:46 pm 
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Prince Judah
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Thanks, CHfan.
I was still editing the expanded revised version above only a few minutes ago. This seems like one of those kinds of lists that can be never-ending as more information is continually added on.

Everyone take note that the major additions have been to the years 1956-1957, and 1962 to 1965, 1970 and 1977. Also take note how the eerie similarities continue, with two films both having the word "Story" in them, made around the same time. :cool2:


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 Post subject: Re: Heston vs. Brando - Film Career Comparison
PostPosted: Wed Aug 28, 2013 12:16 pm 
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El Cid
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Chrysagon, I am pleased you added the documentary KING: A FILMED RECORD ... MONTGOMERY TO MEMPHIS to your list. I had completely forgotten about that one; come to think of it, has any Heston fan ever seen it? I am still not sure if Heston actually appeared in it, I thought he was just the narrator. Today is the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King's 'I have a dream speech' and there will be a programme on BBC1 tonight marking it. I hope Chuck gets a mention. Incidentally, there will be a full recital of that famous civil rights address on Radio 4, and it doesn't come cheap. Dr King's lawyer, Clarence B Jones, 82, cannily copyrighted the speech just before his client delivered it on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, meaning that anyone who wants to use it has to pay a five-figure sum to the activist's three surviving children. Three years ago, the King's caused outrage when they demanded £600,000 for the use of their father's image on Washington's King Memorial.
This week Heston's image has been in a few British newspapers concerning his work for the civil rights, and TIME magazine had a few great photos of Heston with James Baldwin, Harry Belafonte, Sidney Poitier, Rita Moreno, Marlon Brando and Burt Lancaster.


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 Post subject: Re: Heston vs. Brando - Film Career Comparison
PostPosted: Wed Aug 28, 2013 8:03 pm 
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Prince Judah
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Yes, James -- and I continue to see these eerie coincidences while posting on our Heston Board here, since I began this thread and we began to discuss the famous civil rights activity in 1963 just as the 50th anniversary comes around today. I wasn't aware of the anniversary date until yesterday, days after I began to work on all this. It's almost like something unknown suggested that I start this thread last week... 8-)


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 Post subject: Re: Heston vs. Brando - Film Career Comparison
PostPosted: Thu Aug 29, 2013 8:47 am 
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El Cid
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I'm pleased you did start this thread Chrysagon ... its great!
I watched an engrossing documentary on BBC2 last night to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the MLK 'I have a dream' speech, MARTIN LUTHER KING AND THE MARCH ON WASHINGTON, and was pleased to see footage of Heston and Brando discussing their input to the proceedings. There was also footage of Heston, James Garner and Harry Belafonte arriving in Washington from California. One minor thing struck me during the programme ... how well Joan Baez looks fifty years after that momentous day. Here is 'The Guardian' review of last nights programme that has a little dig at Heston.
http://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio ... -tv-review

John Crace
The Guardian, Thursday 29 August 2013
History is seldom remembered as it actually happened. Even – or maybe, especially – when you have lived through it. Wednesday was the 50th anniversary of one of the key moments in American civil rights and Martin Luther King and the March on Washington (BBC2) was a more-than-handy corrective for faulty memories. Over time, the march has become inextricably linked with Martin Luther King's "I have a dream" speech and his voice and delivery still send shivers through the listener. Yet it turned out that the most quoted part of the speech was something of an afterthought. King had been talking for some time when Mahalia Jackson whispered in his ear: "Tell them about your dream." He did and history was made.

While this film aimed to do little more than retell the story of the march from the perspective of those who took part, it also couldn't help pointing a few fingers along the way. And not just at the obvious targets of "Bull" Connor, the police chief of Birmingham, Alabama, who vigorously pursued the city's racial discrimination policies, and George Wallace, the governor of Alabama, whose most famous line was "segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation for ever". President Kennedy also copped it. For all his liberal rhetoric, JFK had done precisely nothing to advance civil rights legislation in his two and a half years in office. Indeed, he came across – as did all the figures of the American establishment – as a man terrified by the thought of mass black protest on the steps of Congress. He called to mind Augustine's prayer: "Lord make me pure, but not yet."

There were other smaller but, in their own way, equally telling memory jolts to be had. Harry Belafonte was asked to use his clout to recruit his Hollywood friends to the cause. Who was one of the leading white actors to speak out for civil rights? None other than Charlton Heston. Chuck is now remembered for being one of Hollywood's staunchest Republican supporters and a key figure in the National Rifle Association: if he were alive today, I wonder what he would make of his younger, more liberal self.

As much as anything else, though, the success of this documentary lay in its range of different voices. So often in TV archive footage the March on Washington is depicted as the Joan Baez, Bob Dylan and Martin Luther King show, yet here we heard not just from the ordinary people who attended but from the other black civil rights leaders involved in its organisation. Not least John Lewis, whose speech was considered too inflammatory and had to be toned down at the last minute. The shocks didn't come from hearing American TV refer to "negroes" in their reports; they came from King using precisely the same terminology.

The film's coda was President Johnson signing the Civil Rights Act in 1964, which embodied many of the demands made by the Washington marchers. MLK: The Assassination Tapes (BBC4) was primarily newsreel film, some of it previously unbroadcast, of the weeks and days leading up to the death of Martin Luther King in 1968. Because it followed immediately after the Washington March, it also made me wonder just how much difference the Civil Rights Act had made in the 1960s. Discrimination was still rife in the south, with black Memphis sanitation workers being paid less than their white colleagues. And the TV crews and King were still calling black people "negroes". I know that's just the way it was, but I was still just as rattled as I had been an hour earlier.


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 Post subject: Re: Heston vs. Brando - Film Career Comparison
PostPosted: Sat Aug 31, 2013 12:19 pm 
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James Byrne wrote:
There were other smaller but, in their own way, equally telling memory jolts to be had. Harry Belafonte was asked to use his clout to recruit his Hollywood friends to the cause. Who was one of the leading white actors to speak out for civil rights? None other than Charlton Heston. Chuck is now remembered for being one of Hollywood's staunchest Republican supporters and a key figure in the National Rifle Association: if he were alive today, I wonder what he would make of his younger, more liberal self.

No need for him to be alive today to tell us what he thought of his more liberal days :roll: As he himself said, the Democratic Party changed more than he did. As for Civil Rights thing? He regarded that as one of the proudest moments of his life, this in his later years.

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 Post subject: Re: Heston vs. Brando - Film Career Comparison
PostPosted: Tue Sep 17, 2013 2:28 pm 
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Prince Judah
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It is a great thread, Chrysagon... I am sorry for my belated appreciation. After reading all these, an idea strikes me-- how about comparing the style, tone and attitude or personality reflected in the autobiographies of both men? Chuck's autobiography and Brando's, I would say, are among the best autobiographies of Hollywood figures.

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 Post subject: Re: Heston vs. Brando - Film Career Comparison
PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2013 4:29 am 
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Prince Judah
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itsjudah24 wrote:
After reading all these, an idea strikes me-- how about comparing the style, tone and attitude or personality reflected in the autobiographies of both men? Chuck's autobiography and Brando's, I would say, are among the best autobiographies of Hollywood figures.

Again, strange and eerie that you mention this, since I just acquired a couple of Brando biographies, one being by Brando himself - "Songs My Mother Taught Me" - and the other by David Thomson (these were available for the cheapest prices possible in used condition at Amazon.com). It's a rather daunting proposition and one I wouldn't be ready to begin for quite a while because I just started reading the bio book by Brando. If you have ideas on starting such a thread, don't let me stop you - go right ahead. But, no rush -- as I said, I still have quite bit of reading to do. :)


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